Reasons Not to File Your Taxes Late

Tax Day was July 15th this year, after a 3 month extension due to COVID-19. If you still haven’t filed your 2019 taxes, you’ll need to contact the IRS for an extension – as soon as possible. You can find out more information and how to file for an extension at IRS.gov

Here are several reasons why it’s important to try to always file your taxes well in advance of the Tax Day deadline:

Possible Penalty Fees – Did you owe the IRS and your payment arrived late or got lost in the mail? You could be charged interest on everything you owe for late payments. Be sure to pay on time if you owe the government money to avoid any and all late fees.

You’ll Be Waiting for Your Refund – If you file late and are getting a tax refund this year, it’s basically withholding your own money from yourself.

You May Have Trouble Paying – If you owe money on your taxes, and it’s in the thousands – you unfortunately still need to pay by Tax Day. Filing late doesn’t give you any extra time to come up with your payment.

Underestimating the Time it Takes – Don’t underestimate the amount of time it takes to file your taxes, especially if you had a life change (marriage, new baby, changed jobs, bought a home) within the past year. It’s important to give yourself ample time before the filing deadline.

Not All Tax Forms May Be Available – It’s much easier these days with tax forms available online, but which ones do you need and how do you fill them out? Are you really sure you know exactly what’s needed and that it will be available if you need it right away? This requires advanced planning.

You Could Need More Information – You almost never have all the documents ready when you file your taxes. What happens if you need to locate an important form (like your W-2) or speak to your accountant, hours before the filing deadline?

Unexpected Things Happen – You may get sick or an emergency may come up. Also, what if you have a technology failure like your printer stops working or your computer won’t turn on? It’s always best to prepare and file early.

You Might Overpay for Advice – Sometimes, requesting last minute advice and service will cost you more. Plus if you’re in a time crunch, you won’t have extra time to find a discount or deal on tax services.

If you do end up filing late, here are some tips:

File for an Extension – If you can’t get your taxes filed by Tax Day, there’s always the option to file for an extension. The down side is that if you owe the government money, you’re still responsible for paying the estimated taxes when you file for the extension. In other words, it’s an extension on filing your taxes, not on paying what you owe. What happens if you can’t pay now? Failing to file for an extension will result in a penalty on top of the bill you already have. The IRS often offers an option to set up a payment installment plan. You can get started online here.

File Your Taxes Online – Filing online is faster and easier, especially if you’re running late. If you’ve never filed your taxes online before, a quick search will lead you to various tax prep businesses that usually offer free e-file along with paid services (like having your return reviewed by a tax professional). If your gross earnings fall under $69,000, you can also use the IRS Free File Program. E-filing requires an electronic pin you’ll use for e-signing, and also – don’t forget to save digital and print copies of your taxes for your records.

Watch for Mistakes – You’re more likely to make mistakes when you’re in a hurry to meet a deadline. The following mistakes are common and costly: Missed deductions, incorrect account or social security numbers, and forgetting to sign and date your return.

The moral of the story: File early next year!

 

Article Source: David Ning for Moneyning.com

How to Prepare for Tax Season

We’re in the midst of prime tax season. Have you filed your taxes yet? If not, or if you are unsure of how to be best prepared – keep reading! Being organized can help you reach your financial goals as well as make the filing process easier for both you and your tax professional.

What items should you bring with you when you have your taxes done?

  • A valid photo ID
  • A social security card or verification letter, or individual TIN (Taxpayer Identification Number) for all family members.
  • W-2 forms for all jobs worked the previous year
  • Form 1099-G for unemployment compensation, if applicable
  • Any childcare provider information from the previous year paid (name, address, tax ID number, and total paid).
  • A copy of last year’s state and federal tax returns
  • Any banking/mortgage interest statements, federal loan documents, retirement statements, and organizations you made charitable donations to with the amount donated.
  • Form 1095-A, B, or C and any affordable health care statements or health insurance exemption certificates.
  • Bank account information and a voided check (for receiving your return via direct deposit).

If you are married and filing jointly with your spouse, you will want to make sure you and your spouse are both present at the appointment so you can each sign your joint return. Depending upon your individual financial situation, there may be other documents you will need to bring with you. If you have questions about other items you think you may need to bring to your annual tax appointment, contact your tax preparer in advance.

How do you make the most of your tax return?

  • If you are getting a return back, it’s a good idea to have it deposited to your bank account with direct deposit. There is no cost to do so, it arrives faster than a check, and will be right there in your bank account for when you need it.
  • It’s always a good idea to save for the future – every little bit helps!
  • Do you have outstanding revolving credit card debt? Pay it down with this year’s tax return.
  • Another good use of your tax return is to save for retirement in an IRA account.

If you have additional questions, it’s a good idea to consult with your tax professional during your appointment. Staying organized and prepared is the best way to get through tax season, and should you receive a return – saving the money for a rainy day, your financial future, or to pay off debt is never a bad idea. Happy filing!

Article Source: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

How to Get Ready for Tax Season

Tax Forms

Make a list of major life changes.

Getting married, having a baby, buying a house, or a death in the family this year means that your tax situation is probably going to change. Make sure you fully understand how these events are going to affect you now to offset any tax increases that you may experience.

Make a tax folder.

Shortly after the first of year all of your tax documents are going to start rolling in. When they do, put them all into one place. Even before those W-2s or 1099s show up, gather all of the receipts from your tax-deductible expenses and donations.

Decide if you are going to go it alone.

If you are going to file yourself, the best time to get a deal on the updated tax software is right after the first of the year. The longer you wait, they more expensive it could be, so make sure you aren’t missing out. If you are going to use an accountant, you should be scheduling an appointment now.

First Financial members get discounts on tax software from TurboTax. Get started today!

Know how to file for an extension.

Sometimes it can be difficult to find all the right documents before the deadline. All you need to do to receive an extension is fill out and submit Form 4868, though the IRS will not be ready to process these forms until March at the earliest.

Educate yourself.

Last year a NerdWallet survey found that the average American scores a 51% on personal finance questions related to US federal income tax returns. Most of the questions missed had to do with how retirement accounts, college savings and healthcare can affect your tax return. Take some time to fully understand all these factors so you can be sure to get your largest return.

Article Source: Tyler Atwell for CUInsight.com

 

3 Reasons Your Tax Refund Might Not Be As Big As You’re Expecting

09ba4dd1-bbe3-4f1f-9400-940dc6df347fEveryone tells you not to plan on having a tax refund. If you’re living paycheck-to-paycheck, though, you know where every dollar is going. You might be counting on that money to give you the breathing space you need.

Even if you’re a little further ahead than that, you may still have made plans for your tax refund. You might be planning to pay off a credit card from the holidays or hoping to put a down payment on a car. You might just be hoping to take a little vacation over spring break!

Whatever your plans for the money, it’s a good idea to temper your expectations. Unfortunately, you can’t count on the same tax refund you got last year. Here’s why.

1. Student loan garnishments. 

If you’re behind on your student loans, you might not see much of your refund. If you don’t have much of an income, it’s easy to get behind and it’s hard to catch up. Student loan companies know that, for people with minimal income, tax refunds are a source of a big chunk of money. Also, since it’s not a regular source of income, the rules regarding garnishment are more lenient. Ordinarily, creditors are only allowed to take 15% of your discretionary income if you have one loan, or 25% if you have multiple loans. For a tax refund, the Department of Education can instruct the IRS to apply the full amount of any tax refund you’re due to the balance of your loan.

Even if you’re paid off in full, it might be wise to check with your spouse. This process can also apply to your refund for his or her defaulted student loans. As far as the IRS is concerned, you’re one taxpayer with one set of obligations.

This process can apply to federal student loans, federally subsidized loans and some private loans. You’ll receive a notice of proposed offset from the IRS. You have 65 days from receipt of the notice to object to the offset. Deferments can be provided for up to 3 years for economic hardship and unemployment. They may be provided indefinitely for individuals seeking an advanced degree or for people with disabilities.

It’s also possible the “loan” may just be a paperwork error. If you’ve unenrolled from classes but haven’t yet received a repayment from the school, for instance, you might get your refund back with a short letter. The notice of referral will provide you instructions to request a review.

2. You made more money.

Usually, getting a raise is something to celebrate. If you got one this year, that’s good news for your career future. It’s less good news for your refund. The refund is the difference between what you paid in taxes and what you ended up owing. Your taxes are withheld from your paychecks assuming they stay the same all year. If you got a raise in June, then you were effectively under-withholding for the first half of the year.

Beyond the difference in payment, you may find your raise puts you just above the threshold for credit programs. Credits like the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) have income eligibility requirements. If you made more money this year than you did last year, you may not qualify. The same is true for subsidized insurance premiums through the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). If your income changed after you obtained coverage, you may have to hand back a part of that subsidy.

The EITC is fairly significant, particularly if you have kids. It may be worth your time to look for other deductions you can take to get your gross income under the threshold. Consider working with a professional tax preparer, too.

3. You were the victim of identity theft.

The past few years have seen an increase in tax returns filed fraudulently on behalf of victims of identity theft. A crook uses your Social Security Number and fabricates financial information to get a hefty tax refund, then cashes the check. You’re not only out your tax refund, but also may be facing criminal charges for the phony info on “your” return.

With cuts to the IRS budget this year, its enforcement and investigation of these crimes has dropped. You should contact the IRS immediately if you receive notice that more than one tax return was filed using your Social Security number or if you are issued a W-2 (an income statement report from your employer) by an employer you don’t recognize. These are red flags that someone is fraudulently using your identity.

The FTC recommends you contact the IRS’s Specialized Protection Unit at 1-800-908-4490. You should also prepare proof of your identity, like a copy of your drivers’ license, Social Security card, or passport. The IRS has a form, IRS ID Theft Affidavit Form 14039, that will start the investigative process. Recovering from this crime will take time, but you will get the refund you’re due.

To prevent identity theft, check out First Financial’s ID Theft Protection products. To learn more about our ID Theft Protection products, click here and enroll today!

Article source courtesy of CUContent.com.

10 IRA Tax Tips

Knowing these 10 IRA tax tips can help you when saving for retirement. When preparing taxes and setting up retirement accounts, it’s important to know how your IRA or individual retirement arrangement affects your tax return. Being knowledgeable will allow you to make smart decisions when contributing to an IRA and how to handle the account in the future until you request disbursement at retirement.

Use these ten IRA tax tips to make smart decisions regarding your retirement future:

  1. Money contributed to a traditional IRA is not taxed until disbursement. Not including Roth IRAs, the person who owns a traditional IRA is not taxed until they request money from the IRA during retirement. Usually, the person’s tax bracket is lower during retirement, saving the person money by waiting to pay taxes until they are retired.
  2. IRAs can only be owned by one person. When the person owning the IRA dies, a beneficiary can be awarded any portion of the monies in an IRA that remains.
  3. Use the correct form. When making nondeductible contributions to a traditional IRA, the taxpayer has to use Form 8606, Nondeductible IRA’s.
  4. Know if you are eligible for a tax credit. Use form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions to find out whether you qualify for a tax credit.
  5. Persons can contribute to a traditional IRA up to the age of 70 years old.  If you are 70 1/2 years or more old at the end of a tax year, you may not contribute to a traditional IRA that year.
  6. To be eligible to contribute to a traditional IRA, the person who takes out the IRA or their spouse must have taxable income from specific sources. Income can come from a salary, wages, self-employment income, tips, commissions, or bonuses. Also included are taxable alimony and maintenance payments that the owner of the IRA received during the tax year. Income that does qualify includes deferred compensation, rental property income, pension or annuity compensation, and dividend and interest income.
  7. Contributions to an IRA can be made up till the tax filing date. You can contribute for the applicable tax year (the previous year) until April 15.
  8. Funds withdrawn from an IRA are taxable the same year they are withdrawn. Withdrawals of only deductible contributions are fully taxable.
  9. Early withdrawal may be taxable. Owners of traditional IRAs who withdraw monies before they are 59-1/2 years old may have to pay an additional ten percent tax.
  10. Late withdrawal may be taxable. Owners of traditional IRAs who do not withdraw the minimum amount after they turn 70-1/2 may owe an excise tax.

Contact the First Financial’s Investment and Retirement Center to set up a no-cost consultation at 732.312.1500 or visit our website for more information.

Article Source: Made Manual, Instructions for Life http://www.mademan.com/mm/10-ira-tax-tips.html#vply=0

What Are You Going To Do With Your Tax Refund?

For many people, good financial news usually comes around April 15, when they will discover that they have a tax refund on the way.  It might be the start of even more good news, as there are some signs that the economy is also turning around.

If you get a refund check from the IRS, great. And if it’s the start of better economic developments for you and your family, even better.

But with positive developments, comes the need to make good decisions. If your financial situation improves – whether on a one-time basis or more permanently – what are you going to do, not only with the money, but with the way you operate financially?

One thing to consider is that your tax refund is not a gift from the federal government. The money belongs to you – it always did – and the government essentially borrowed it from you for the better part of the year without paying you interest. You might want to consider adjusting your withholding so less will be taken out of your check. We understand that people love their tax refund checks, but you could have been earning interest on that money all year long. Assuming you saved it and didn’t spend it, you would end up with more money that way than waiting for a refund check.

But that save-not-spend part of the equation is important. When you start earning a little more money, it’s a good time to reassess how you budget, how you save and how you plan.

On the one hand, you want to pay off any high-interest debt as quickly as you can. On the other hand, you want to put something away for your future – especially retirement. And it’s a good idea to have some money in a rainy-day fund – with easy access to the cash – in case of something unforeseen.

The best idea is to develop a plan that incorporates all of these priorities. Develop a budget that takes into account all of your regular expenses, then allocates portions of what’s leftover for debt payments, savings and a rainy-day fund.

Having developed that plan, treat your tax refund like a paycheck and use the money accordingly. Then treat all your subsequent paychecks in the same way.

There’s plenty you can do. In addition to paying off debt and saving, if there is something you’ve been needing (not wanting) to buy, it’s wise to pay cash for it if you can, so you don’t add credit card debt. Beyond that, priorities might include:

  • Home improvements
  • Investing in a tax-sheltered account, like a 529 or Roth IRA, depending on your income and goals
  • Investing in a taxable account like a Brokerage Account
  • Giving to charity
  • And if you still have money left over, buying something you just simply want isn’t such a bad thing to do

Our experts located at First Financial, can walk you through the process. It’s worth remembering: The economy tends to go in cycles, and when you save and eliminate debt today, you put yourself in a stronger position for when times are tougher. Make a plan, stick to the plan, and watch as your situation continues to improve. Maybe that tax refund check will be the start of something pretty special. Give us a call at 732.312.1500 to set up a no-cost consultation or visit our website for more information!

Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. FR031214-CF9C