Financial Questions Everyone Should Be Asking

Here are some important questions that will help you get to know your finances a little better, and plan ahead for your financial future.

1. Are you regularly surprised by running out of money?

It’s one thing for money to be tight, but if you are repeatedly coming up short on being able to pay your bills or by overdrafting your checking account, it is a sign that you are not in control of your budget. Step one is formulating a budget that lets you live within your means, and step two is putting controls in place to make sure you follow that budget.

2. Do you save up for big purchases or rely mostly on credit?

Borrowing may be necessary for major purchases like a house or a car. But if you find yourself making routine purchases on a credit card, you are making those items way more expensive than they need to be by adding interest to the cost. The more you can wait and save up to buy things, the more you will be able to afford.

3. Have you formulated a retirement savings plan?

People tend to assume that buying a house is the biggest financial decision they will ever make, but chances are you will need even more money to retire on than it costs to buy a house. It takes years of effort to build up enough of a nest egg, and that effort starts with figuring out how you are going to save that money.

Need help with retirement planning or investments? To set up a complimentary consultation with the Investment & Retirement Center located at First Financial Federal Credit Union to discuss your savings goals, contact us at 732.312.1500, email mary.laferriere@cunamutual.com or stop in to see us!*

4. Is your retirement savings on track?

It may be hard to feel a sense of urgency about something that may be 20 or 30 years in the future, but if you wait until retirement saving becomes urgent, you will have left it too late. Start holding yourself accountable now, so you won’t have to try playing catch up in the last few years of your career.

5. If you have investments, how well are they performing?

People tend to focus on the big winners and losers in their portfolios, but what matters more is how everything has performed in aggregate. Performance measurement should focus not just on how well you have done, but whether your investments have behaved appropriately for the prevailing market conditions.

6. What is your credit score?

Banks, insurance companies and even prospective employers are going to know this about you, so you should probably know your credit score yourself. Check your credit report for free annually by visiting annualcreditreport.com.

7. What could you do to improve your credit score?

If your credit score is less than perfect, it could cost you in the form of higher interest rates, or even limit your ability to get credit. Identify what you need to do to address any problems so your score will improve over time.

8. What would happen to your finances if you were out of work for 6 months?

It may seem tough to build up that big of a cushion, but the median duration of unemployment peaked at nearly 26 weeks in the aftermath of the Great Recession. Knowing how close to the edge a period of joblessness would put you, is a good test of your financial wellness.

Some of these are questions that people just neglect to ask. Others are questions they are afraid to ask, because they might not like the answers. However, it’s better to ask these questions when you have the time and opportunity to deal with them constructively and create a financial game plan for your future.

*Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Non-deposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Article Source: Richard Barrington for Moneyrates.com

 

10 Life Events That Require Financial Planning

Sometimes even the best events in life – a birth, new job or dream relocation, need a financial plan. They might require more insurance coverage, a new budget, or guidance from a financial advisor. Here are 10 life events that should inspire you to do some financial planning:

1. The opportunity to buy a vacation home.

Summer rental homes can represent bliss, that great escape you have every year. Summer homes are often bought as emotions rise at the end of the season. But purchasing a vacation home can be a complicated long-term commitment. A financial planner, not a real estate agent, can tell you what to consider.

2. You got that big raise you’ve been counting on for years.

Pay raises are typically small and incremental, so getting a big raise is cause for celebration. They also mean it’s time to do some financial planning to determine how much you should be saving for the future, too. It might be time to bump up your retirement savings. Talk with your financial advisor ASAP!

3. Wedding bells are ringing, finally.

Couples might be marrying later these days than they used to. So when they finally do tie the knot, combining finances can be even more complicated. Prenups might be a buzzkill, but they can help protect each person’s savings and prevent any misunderstandings. They are especially important if either member of the couple is bringing children into the marriage.

4. You got your diploma.

Graduates might not think they have enough money to talk to a financial planner, but they face key money choices as they start repaying their share of the overall $1 trillion in college debt with “starter” jobs. They could certainly use help prioritizing payments for credit cards and student loans.

5. You’re relocating.

The 50 states can be as different as moving to another country. Tax rates differ and cost of living can shift dramatically. There are scores of moving-related expenses too. Make sure you do your homework and are prepared.

6. You just got an inheritance.

Baby boomers stand to inherit significant wealth in the coming years, and receiving lump sums also carries with it financial responsibility. It can raise questions about spending habits, charitable contributions, tax payments and a multitude of other concerns. You might want to get help from a professional as you figure out how to handle this money.

7. You’re expecting a new arrival in the family.

When a baby arrives, life inevitably gets way more complicated. It could be worth it to factor in some financial planning alongside baby naming or stroller shopping. You might want to open a 529 savings account (for future college), as well as take out additional life insurance policies.

8. You got your first real job.

Your college grad may act like they just want to have fun, but they often need guidance during this key life transition. Consider sending your child to a financial planner before they enter the workforce.

9. You get offered a generous severance package.

Emotions often run high when your employer offers a big severance package. It’s important to understand the complex financial issues associated with severance packages. You want to make sure you understand all the fine print before you sign on the dotted line.

10. You retire.

Retirement is considered the pivotal financial moment in a person’s life. If you haven’t already worked with a financial planner to figure out your plans and budget, then now is the time. In fact, financial advisors urge even clients in their 20s and 30s to start planning for this major life transition, to make sure they’re saving enough during their peak earning years. It’s also a good time to reflect upon what you’d like to do with your retirement.

To set up a complimentary consultation with the Investment & Retirement Center located at First Financial Federal Credit Union to discuss your savings goals with a Financial Advisor, contact us at 732.312.1500 or stop in to see us!*

 *Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Non-deposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Article source: U.S. News Staff for money.usnews.com