3 Steps to Reduce Your Impulse Spending

It can be tough to resist spending money. When you see something you want, especially when it’s at a price you like – it can be difficult to keep from making the purchase. With the way the internet and our smartphone apps have made it so easy to shop, the solution isn’t as simple as just avoiding the stores. If you’ve got an itch for shopping, here are three steps you can take to help you get back in control of your finances.

Take your time: During an impulse buy, for the most part – the whole process from finding the item to paying for it only takes a few minutes. Next time you’re about to hit the “buy now” button, slow down. Put the item in your online shopping cart, but wait before completing the transaction. Try not to buy anything the day you add it to your online cart. Let it sit and think – do you really need this item?

Think it over: If you’re still thinking about that item after sleeping on it, go back into your online shopping cart. In your cart you’ll be able to see the total price (including taxes and shipping), and decide for yourself if the item is really worth that total cost. At this point, look around some more online and try to find a better deal, but still – don’t buy the item (yet). After you’ve done all your research, put the item on your wish list or save it for later.

Be ready: You’ve thought about your purchase for days now, and you know you’re going to buy the item. You’ve done the research and you’ve found the lowest price. Do you have the money to make the purchase in your checking account? If the answer is yes, then go ahead and complete the transaction. If you don’t have the money now, save and start the process over when you’ve saved up enough to buy it without going into debt.

These same steps work for in store impulse purchases too. If you see something you’d like to buy when physically in the store – think about it for a day. The next day do some comparison shopping to make sure you are getting the best price. Still want the item on the 3rd day and you have shopped around and have the money to buy it? Head back to the store and make your purchase.

It pays (literally), to be a savvy shopper and reduce your impulse purchases!

Article Source: John Pettit for CUInsight.com

3 Tips to Keep Debt Away

Sometimes we build up debt due to emergencies or situations that are beyond our control. Sometimes we just buy too many things we don’t really need. Here are three things to think about when it comes to your finances and how you can avoid debt as much as possible.

Set financial goals: Goal-setting is very important when it comes to your money. Your budget should be an easily attainable financial goal for you. If you’re having trouble staying within a budget, it’s probably a good idea to take a closer look at it. When it comes to saving money, have a defined purpose. Every time you get paid, set up your direct deposit to put money into retirement and an emergency fund automatically. This way you won’t physically be transferring the money and convincing yourself that you can do without putting anything into savings this month. If there is a large purchase you want to make or a vacation you want to go on, open a savings account for that wish list.

Have more self-control: It’s easy to buy something impulsively (especially when it’s inexpensive), but those small purchases can really add up if you’re making them all the time. You need to start saying no to yourself and be really disciplined if you want to be free of debt. Having new things is great and exciting, but are those items worth going into debt over?

Ignore pay raises: If you budget your paycheck as if you’re making less than you do, it’ll be easier to save for the things you want in the future. Plus, you won’t have to put yourself in debt to get them. It may not always be easy to cut back, especially if you have a big family, but every little bit helps. And when pay raises come, redirect those additional funds to your savings account and forget all about them!

Article Source: John Pettit for CUInsight.com

How to Save Money Even on a Tight Budget

Saving money is important, but sometimes it can be hard to find extra money to save – right? While saving money can often be a challenge, it’s not impossible to do – even on a strict budget. Here are three ways you may be able to save when your spare funds are on the lower side.

Find deals online: Sites like Groupon or Living Social have a lot of deals in terms of entertainment and dining out. Did you know you can use them for much more? Both often have deals on electronics, automotive repair, health and beauty, home services and more! The best way to find these deals is to register with your zip code and browse around to find how you can save locally. If these are products and services that you’re already going to pay for or that you’re in need of, saving money in the process is an added bonus!

Trim it up: When you go on a diet, you may notice a little bit of weight loss in several different areas of your body. You should treat your budget the exact same way. Don’t try to cut back on (or completely cut out) one budget item, but trim a few dollars from different places. Some bills you aren’t going to be able to budge on, but you will most likely find a few areas you can cut back here and there. Take advantage of these savings and you’ll start to see it add up. Plus, you won’t feel as if you’re cutting anything out of your budget completely.

Spend more time at home: The more you’re out and about, the more you’re going to eat meals out and spend money on items you don’t really need. Instead of meeting your friends out for dinner and a movie, host a potluck dinner (ask everyone to bring something) – and watch your favorite movie or rent one from your local Redbox. You’ll save money, plus you can pause the movie when you need to and not spend a fortune on movie theater snacks. That’s a win-win for everyone!

Need help budgeting? Check out our online budgeting fillable worksheet!

Article Source: John Pettit for CUInsight.com

 

How to Create an Easy to Follow Budget

Are you the type of person that when you see something you like, you just buy it? It really is important to plan for the future and really take hold of your finances. If you or someone you know doesn’t budget well, here are a few easy ways to get started.

Housing: This category will most likely be the largest portion of your budget. If you’re a homeowner, along with the mortgage, insurance, and property taxes – make sure you include necessary utilities (gas, sewer, electric, etc.), and some extra cash for any emergency repairs. If you’re renting, you’ll still have to budget for your monthly rent and any utilities.

Transportation: When it comes to transportation, there’s a lot more than just your monthly car payment. Gas, insurance, and preventative maintenance such as oil changes – should also be included within your budget. This is another area where it’s a good idea to save some extra cash for any repairs you may not see coming. Planning ahead will help keep your car on the road, which will also keep money in your pocket.

Life: This budget category will cover a lot (think food, health insurance, medical, clothing, entertainment, wireless, tuition, childcare, etc.). All of these items will add up to a sizable portion of your budget. You may need to separate some into their own category and monitor them.

Debt and Savings: This final category is one of the most important. Saving money for your future (401k, Roth IRA) is something you want to make sure you’re doing every month. The earlier you start, the better. You’ll be surprised at how a little each month can add up over time when you make use of compound interest. Also, make sure you’re steadily paying down any debt you have – so you can enjoy your financial freedom.

Need help setting up a budget? Check out our budgeting guide.

Article Source: John Pettit for CUInsight.com

5 Ways You Should Never Use Your Credit Card

We all know that credit cards can be a valuable tool. They can help you build credit when you’re just starting out, and can really benefit you in the case of a spending emergency. However – if you’re not careful, they can do more harm than good. When it comes to spending, here are five ways you should really never use your credit card.

To help you feel better: Yes, a new purchase can cheer you up, but if you’re looking to feel better – a mountain of debt probably will only make things worse in the long run. If you feel the need to splurge, use whatever cash you have in your wallet or make sure you’re spending from your checking account using a debit card instead.

Hospital bills: Credit cards are best to use on a purchase that you can pay off quickly. Medical bills typically aren’t small, so be sure to think about how long it could take you to pay off that amount of debt. This type of debt can quickly build up, being that you are probably paying a pretty high interest rate each month.

A cash advance: If you’re in a pinch, you might think taking a cash advance from your credit card is a good idea. However, you should first consider other options before going down this road. A cash advance may seem like a good option, but it may carry a higher interest rate than your normal credit card. You may want to do some digging into the fine print in your account disclosures before considering this.

Paying for college: This is probably one of the worst things you could ever put on a credit card. You may not be thrilled about student loans, but those usually come with much lower interest rates than a credit card ever could. If you’re having trouble paying for school and you don’t have a full time job yet, you may be sitting on this debt for years – if it’s on a credit card. It would not be a wise decision to begin your financial future with thousands in credit card debt.

To help start a small business: It’s great to follow your dreams, and if starting a small business is one of them – wonderful. However, charging your business equipment to a credit card is not the best idea. Try looking into a small business loan instead, rather than purchasing items on a higher interest credit card. No one wants to think about it, but what happens if your small business doesn’t make it and you’re still paying off thousands on equipment you can no longer use?

If you are looking for higher credit lines, lower APRs, no annual fees, no balance transfer fees, a 10-day grace period, rewards (cash back or on travel & retailer gift cards), an EMV security chip, and more, check out First Financial’s Visa Credit Card options. Click here to learn more and apply online today.

 *APR varies up to 18% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. These APRs are for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. Rates quoted assume excellent borrower credit history. Your actual APR may vary based on your state of residence, approved loan amount, applicable discounts and your credit history. No Annual Fees. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Credit Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, volunteers, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties. No late fee will be charged if payment is received within 10 days from the payment due date.

Article Source: John Pettit for CUInsight.com