Don’t Make These Tax Filing Mistakes

From math errors to missing Social Security Numbers to forms that aren’t signed, there are plenty of common tax mistakes that taxpayers can make when filing their returns. These mistakes can lead to delays in processing returns and issuing refunds. If serious enough, they might even lead to an IRS audit. Fortunately though, the IRS does allow do-overs. You can usually file an amended return if you realize that you’ve made a mistake. But that’s the problem — you might not realize you’ve made a mistake. Brush up on the following tax fails before you file, so you can avoid making the same errors this tax season.

Waiting Until the Last Minute to File

Although plenty of people put off doing their taxes, waiting until the last minute to file a tax return can backfire.  Do you really want to be scrambling to make the tax filing deadline (April 15th)? In a rush to file, you may forget to actually pay your taxes if you owe – which can result in a late payment penalty from the IRS (0.5% of taxes owed each month the payment is late). File as early as possible and avoid this headache altogether.

Forgetting to Pay Taxes on a Cashed-Out IRA

Did you cash out IRA money last year or plan to roll one over and then never did? If you forget to do this, the amount that has been cashed out is taxable. You also need to report any IRA changes on your tax return. If you forget to do this, it could result in a tax audit. And once that happens, everything will be checked with a fine tooth comb. The moral of the story: don’t forget to report any retirement account changes you made in the last year.

Mailing the Tax Check to the Wrong Agency

If you owe taxes or have a situation in which you have to pay taxes on an employee during the year (you hired a nanny to watch your children and are paying taxes on the nanny’s wages), be sure your payment is going to the right place. Failure to do this can again result in late fees and a giant headache. The same goes for electronic payments. Double check the mailing address and then check again.

Not Knowing the Filing Deadline for Businesses

Are you an S corporation? Typically, an S corporation business must file a return by the 15th day of the third month — not the fourth month, according to the IRS. Failure to file by the correct deadline could result in a file penalty fine of $450.

Not Making Estimated Tax Payments

Because self-employed workers don’t have employers to withhold taxes from their paycheck for them, they have to make estimated tax payments to the IRS throughout the year.  A good habit to get into here if this pertains to you, is to set aside money each month and try to estimate as accurately as you can – should you owe more on taxes when you file.

Forgetting to Make Tax Payments

This is a pretty straightforward one – don’t forget to make your tax payments if you owe this year. And if you are self-employed, don’t forget to send in your estimated tax payments. If you are required to send in estimated tax payments and you forget, you could receive an underpayment penalty fee.

Trying to DIY Tricky Tax Returns

If your tax situation is simple enough to file the 1040 form, you don’t need to hire a professional to prepare your return. But if you don’t have a simple tax situation and have multiple sources of income, own a home (or two), have investments, a military pension, etc. – it might be a good idea to let a professional handle filing your return for you.  A tax accountant can help you identify expenses you hadn’t previously been claiming as deductions, which can ultimately lower your tax bill. They’ll also look at your withholding with you, and see if it can be adjusted if you always seem to owe the IRS money come tax time each year. Sure – you’re going to have to pay for this service, but if you have a complicated tax return it will probably end up saving you money (and aggravation) in the long run.

More sound advice: it’s best to prepare for tax season all throughout the year. As you collect receipts, paperwork, statements, and so forth during the year – put them in a file and take them out and go over them right at the start of each new year. This way you stay on top of any changes that come up throughout the year, and aren’t digging for items at the last minute. Be prepared and organized, and filing your taxes each year will become second nature.

Article Source: Cameron Huddleston for Gobankingrates.com

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