3 Things You Should Do With Extra Money ASAP

According to a recent report by CareerBuilder, 78% of Americans who work full-time live paycheck to paycheck. Thinking about the long term is hard, especially when it comes to finances, but life does get easier the earlier you start laying the foundation for good financial habits. Whether you have $100 or $1000 to spare every month, investing extra funds wisely can have a significant impact on your financial future.

1. Pay Off Your Debt

First and foremost, consider putting part or all of your extra income every month toward paying off your debt. Being in any kind of debt can definitely loom heavily over your life and finances. Instead of spending any extra cash, it’s smart to chip away at that mountain to become debt-free. You should start with your highest interest debt first and work your way down, though some people find more motivation to tackle their debt by focusing on paying the smaller debts first.

2. Put it in Your Emergency Fund

Having an emergency fund is not just a smart idea, it’s a necessity. Life is unexpected and you never know what can happen. Having an emergency fund can help you in life’s hardest situations, such as a car accident or the loss of a job. Begin putting money toward an emergency fund, any little bit helps. It’s ideal to have six months of expenses saved up just in case.

3. Invest in Your Retirement

After you’ve paid off your debt and put money in your emergency fund, it’s now time to think about the future – which means retirement. While it’s still years or maybe decades away, saving for retirement as early as possible means you reap more rewards later. And that can start with a 401k. Surprisingly, many full-time workers are unaware that their employers may match up to a percentage of your contribution to the company’s 401k plan. Find out what your company’s policy is and get started with contributing to your retirement as soon as possible.

A Roth IRA is another popular retirement savings account that allows your money to grow tax-free. When you’re ready to withdraw at retirement, you do not pay taxes on these funds. If you’re under the age of 50, the most you can contribute to a Roth IRA is $5,500 yearly. This basically means that those who have earned income, can put in just over $458 monthly to reap the most benefits in their retirement future.

If you have extra income at the end of every month, start with these three steps. It will set up a healthy financial foundation for you and your family. Going forward if you still have money leftover after that, you might want to start looking into investments or perhaps spending a bit on yourself.

Need help with retirement planning? To set up a complimentary consultation with the Investment & Retirement Center located at First Financial Federal Credit Union to discuss your savings goals, email mary.laferriere@cunamutual.com or stop in to see us!*

*Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Non-deposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Article Source: Connie Mei for moneyning.com

 

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