4 Personal Finance Myths: Busted!

A computer generated image of a chain with a broken link.Financial myths are a force behind one of the biggest threats to your financial future – yourself. Here are some personal finance myths that could be costing you money and endangering your future security.

Myth 1: Two incomes are better than one. Truth: Today’s families often have two incomes out of necessity. They make more money than a one-income family did a generation ago. But, by the time they pay for the basics – an average home, a second car to get the second spouse to work, child care, health insurance, taxes, and other essentials, that family actually has less money left over at the end of the month to show for it.

The assumption in the myth is that with two incomes you’re doubly secure. But if you’re counting on both of those incomes, then you’re in serious trouble if either income goes away. And, if you have two people in the workforce, you have double the chance that someone will get laid off, or that someone could get too sick to work.

Housing prices are rising twice as fast for families with kids, and a big reason is dwindling confidence in public schools. People are bidding up the prices on homes situated in school districts with good reputations. The only way for a typical family to afford one of those homes is for both spouses to work. Average mortgage expenses have risen 70 times faster than the average family’s primary income, so, families are required to keep two incomes.

When two incomes are a necessity, the question of whether two may be better than one is moot. Busting this particular myth means understanding the true financial stakes involved in deciding to have children and raising a family, based on your personal situation.

Myth 2: Owning is always better than renting. Truth: The money you pay for rent is a necessity like your other living expenses. Do you consider the money you spend on food to be wasted? What about the money you spend on gas? Both of these expenses are for items you purchase regularly that get used up and appear to have no lasting value, but are necessary to carry out daily activities.

If you own a home, unless you paid cash for it, you pay a mortgage (and it’s likely as much as you’d be spending on rent), plus other expenses like property taxes, insurance, maintenance, etc.

The choice between owning and renting is often a financial toss up. Busting this myth means understanding the most important reason to buy a home. Decide how badly you want to settle down for the long-term and invest in a permanent residence.

First Financial offers a number of great mortgage options, including refinancing – click here to learn about our 10, 15, and 30 year mortgage features and see what a good fit for your home is!*

To receive updates on our low mortgage rates straight to your mobile phone, text FIRSTRATE to 69302 and each time our mortgage rates change, we’ll send you a text message with the new rates.**

Myth 3: A near-perfect credit score will get you the best loan rate. Truth: Every expert, credit bureau, and loan officer has a different opinion as to where the threshold for excellent credit lies. In addition, “near-perfect” can be a relative term. Do we mean “near-perfect” as in “excellent,” or as in “perfect,” which doesn’t exist? Different loans and lenders have different standards.

Generally, any credit score in the mid-700 range and up is considered excellent credit, and will get you credit approvals and the best interest rates. But at this high end of credit scoring, extra points don’t always improve your loan terms much. Sure, the higher your score, the better. But even an extra 50 points in this range doesn’t always help you get a better rate on your next loan.

Those extra points can serve as a buffer if a negative item shows up on your credit report, however. For example, if you max out a credit card, you can get dinged 30-50 points. An extra 50 points would absorb the hit and minimize the possible damage.

So, there really is no “magic number” when it comes to credit scores. Busting this myth means understanding that more than just your score is taken into consideration. To get the loan you want, you may need a high credit score, no negatives in your credit file, and adequate income to afford it.

Myth 4: You need to earn more to save more. Truth: Your ability to save is defined by your discipline to sacrifice and set aside a percentage of your spending. Your income level is not really a factor. And no matter the amount, the younger you start saving, the more years you’ll have for your money and any interest earned to work its magic. You may decide you want to invest some of your savings too – talk to a financial planner and decide if investing in stocks and mutual funds might be a good option for your savings goals.

So, savings is not some arbitrary amount – but a discipline. Busting this myth means understanding that you need to sacrifice some of your spending now for financial security later. You simply have to decide how important that security is to you.

Consider how these personal finance myths and others like them could be contributing to money problems you’re experiencing now, and pose more serious trouble for your future.

“Busting” these myths offers the answers you need to take action and change your behavior with money – and assure your financial security.

Article Source: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/why-these-4-personal-finance-myths-perpetuate-money-problems-cm396086

*A First Financial membership is required to obtain a mortgage and is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, volunteers, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties. Subject to credit approval. Credit worthiness determines your APR.

 **Standard text messaging and data rates may apply.

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