How to Avoid Phishing Scams Especially During These Times

In the current environment amidst a worldwide pandemic, fraudsters know most people are frequently using technology to do anything and everything right now. These cybercriminals are counting on society being distracted and letting guards down. One of their favorite tactics to do this is through phishing. Criminals are using email, phone call, text message, website and social media to deploy phishing scams these days.

Here are some common forms of phishing that you might encounter and the warning signs to look out for, so that you don’t become a victim:

1. Phone Call Phishing. Cybercriminals know how to mask phone numbers and change them to make it look like your bank or credit card company is calling you. Usually on this type of call the fraudster tells you they are from the Security and Fraud Department. They will often tell you that your card has been flagged for suspicious activity and you need to prove the card is in your possession. You’ll be asked to give them the 3-digit security code on the back of the card, your PIN, or a one-time passcode they email to you.

2. Email Phishing. There are several warning signs you’ll often see on a phishing email. The most common are spelling and grammar errors, including in the email subject. Also always take note of the sender’s email address. You’ll often see that it doesn’t match up, for example IRS.net (instead of IRS.gov) or using zero’s and other numbers in place of letters in the middle of a sender’s email address (j0hnsm1th@gmail and so forth). Email phishing attempts also often include deadlines, threatening language, doesn’t address you by name, often doesn’t include contact information like a legitimate company email would, and includes suspicious hyperlinks that you should NEVER click on. You should also know that a financial institution will never ask you for any financial information via email.

3. Text Message Phishing. Similar to the phone phishing scam, you would receive a text phishing attempt where the message tells you it’s your bank and they send you a link to click on instead of including a phone number for you to contact them. The message will state that the link in the text is to verify your banking information, a recent transaction, provide your PIN or your 3-digit credit card CVV code. A financial institution will never ask you to click on a link to verify any sensitive information.

4. Website Phishing. A spoofed website will often look strange. Either the web address is off (amaz0n1.com), words will be misspelled, and logos will look blurry or distorted. Sometimes on a site like this you’ll also see a pop up that asks you to enter your personal information. This is another item you should NEVER do. Another thing to note on a phony website, is when you hover over a link – a different address will show. Do not click on these links either.

5. Social Media Phishing. Often you’ll receive a friend request from someone you don’t know or a post asking you to click on a link that requests personal information. If you ever receive any requests like this, ignore them.

For more information on phishing and other computer-based scams, visit the National Cyber Security Alliance at https://staysafeonline.org/

Stay safe and Think First because There’s Harm INot Knowing!

Article Source: usa.Visa.com

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