5 Ways to Protect Your Financial Info from Hackers

Information breaches that would have been difficult to fathom years ago are now common. And people are rightfully worried. After all, if the federal government can get hacked and its employees’ data stolen, how vulnerable is a personal account held at a bank or brokerage?

So what actions can you take to protect yourself in what feels like an endless battle to keep your data secure? Here are five steps to consider:

 1. Diversify your passwords – and change them.

For the user’s convenience they often use the same password across multiple websites, which is a big mistake. It’s like giving an intruder a key that opens every lock. You want to make it extremely difficult for a hacker to access your sensitive information. Create unique password combinations (including letters, numbers and symbols) for each of the financial websites you log into, and establish a bi-annual schedule to change them.

2. Use an online password manager.

All of those hard to crack passwords can be a nightmare to remember and store, so utilize a reputable password manager. The best managers include password generators that create strong and unique choices. Most password managers allow you to sync your passwords across all electronic devices, making it easy to maintain multiple passwords.

3. Make life hard for crooks.

Shredding confidential documents, avoiding simple passwords, and keeping sensitive information off of unsecured channels are all effective actions. Thoroughly checking credit card statements for suspicious activity, and being aware of your surroundings when using ATMs, are security measures that remain effective. Don’t let your guard down. Learn more about preventing fraud at the ATM here.

4. Check your credit reports at least annually.

Periodically checking your credit report is a smart way to stay ahead of the bad guys, but many people don’t because of common misconceptions like the belief that you have to pay a fee to see your report, or that you must subscribe to a service.

The goal is to check for discrepancies, inconsistences and inaccuracies that might suggest identity theft. Annualcreditreport.com is a great (free) place to start.

5. Keep your guard up when it comes to emails.

Be wary of any email that requires you to click on a hyperlink to update a password or confirm confidential material. These emails are often “phishing” attempts seeking to scam you. They appear to come from familiar places such as your bank, an online retailer, or even the IRS. But – they are not legitimate, so be very careful before you open them!

It’s understandable to feel helpless in an age of smart criminals who conduct endless assaults on privacy. But simply putting the threat out of mind is not a solution, or thinking it can’t happen to you. Think first because there’s harm in not knowing!

Don’t wait until it’s too late! Be sure to enroll in First Financial’s Identity Theft Protection Program from Sherpa today. The best part? You can enroll right online, 24/7. You can trust in First Financial and Sherpa to help keep your personal information protected. Packages begin at just $5.99 per month – so click here to enroll today!

Article Source: Richard Rosso for nerdwallet.com

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