10 Ways Too Many People Throw Money Away

Packs of dollar in the garbage can. Waste of money or currency collapse concept. 3d

There are all sorts of ways to cut spending and boost your savings, and there are just as many ways to sabotage your own finances. In addition to missing out on money-saving discounts, making unwise shopping decisions, and purchasing unnecessary items, you might also be throwing your money down the drain without even realizing.  Keep reading to ensure this doesn’t happen to you!

1. Never redeeming gift cards.

Even if you don’t want your gift card, at least give it to someone who will use it. According to statistics compiled by Gift Card Granny, more than $41 billion in gift cards went unused over a 6 year period. American households also average $300 in unused gift cards, and nearly half of recipients do not use the full value of the card. Don’t let dollars go down the drain!

2. Letting Groupons expire.

According to Yipit, roughly 15% of Groupons go unredeemed by the time the expiration date rolls around. Make a note of your daily deal coupon’s expiration date to ensure this doesn’t happen to you. And if your Groupon does expire, you may be able to contact the merchant directly to get some value from it.

3. Buying tickets and not showing up.

Purchasing tickets for a concert, sporting event, or other cultural activity often requires planning far in advance. But if you change your mind later or something comes up, you’ve already spent that money. These days people even buy movie tickets in advance online. If you can’t get a refund, you may be able to at least pass along your tickets to a friend. To make every dollar count, when possible it’s best to wait until you are certain to actually buy your tickets.

4. Paying late fees.

Even small late fees add up quickly. This can include everything from overdue library books, Redbox DVD rentals, or late payments on utilities. To avoid incurring late fees on your credit card, pay in advance of your due date, schedule automatic payment, or set a reminder for yourself. If you are hit with a late fee, call customer service and ask to have the charge waived. On your first offense many companies are willing to let the late fee go.

5. Paying bank fees.

It seems like every year big banks come up with new ways to nickel and dime their customers. Between minimum balances, fees for checking accounts, and ATM fees – these charges can add up. Avoid these unnecessary fees by joining a local credit union like First Financial! Credit unions typically offer free checking accounts and savings accounts with better interest rates.

6. Not returning unwanted goods.

It’s easy to let unwanted items or gifts just sit there in the closet, but with a little effort, you could be getting money back in your pocket. Even if you are past the return date, give it a try anyway. You may be able to at least get store credit. For online purchases, many retailers even cover the cost of shipping for returns. Some retailers will even take returns without a receipt.

7. Failing to ask for a refund.

Consumers who are dissatisfied with their service often don’t take the time to voice their concerns. The ones who do however, could end up with a full refund or at least a discount. If you have a bad experience, don’t be shy about speaking up. Even if you don’t get any money back, retailers and service providers should know when their customers aren’t satisfied.

8. Never disputing mistakes on a bill.

If you think your bill may be incorrect, it’s worth disputing the charges with the company. At most respectable businesses, the error will quickly be corrected. Unexpected medical bills are also a growing problem, and patients almost never file a complaint with a state agency. The Consumers Union online insurance complaint tool is a good place to start.

9. Forgetting to follow up on a rebate.

The sneaky thing about mail-in rebates is they are designed to be so complicated that consumers either forget to mail them in or do so incorrectly. More than $500 million in rebates go unfilled every year, often due to deceptive practices. The Wall Street Journal reported that about 40% of mail-in rebates go unredeemed or are filed incorrectly and denied. Think twice before getting involved in a rebate in the first place. If you are waiting on a rebate check from weeks or months ago, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

10. Not claiming money that’s yours.

Every year, unclaimed money is reported by the government, and rightful owners are encouraged to step forward and claim their funds. In 2013, states, federal agencies, and other organizations together reported $58 billion in unclaimed cash and benefits. This can include unclaimed IRS refunds, old bank accounts and stock holdings, unclaimed life insurance payouts, mortgage refunds, forgotten pension benefits, and more. Health insurance companies report forgotten funds as well. And if that money isn’t claimed, it gets turned over to the state.

The moral of the story – pay attention, follow up when necessary, and don’t throw good money away!

Article Source: Chloe Della Costa, http://www.cheatsheet.com/personal-finance/10-ways-that-too-many-people-throw-money-away.html/?a=viewall

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