11 Easy Ways To Save Money

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There are few things better than realizing that an easy habit you picked up landed you an extra couple hundred dollars by the end of the month. Maybe it was finally ditching that morning cold brew from the funky coffee place down the street. Maybe it was scouring the below-eye-level shelves for some major deals from the grocery store.

Because you can never have enough tips on being smarter about saving money, we’ve rounded up a few creative ways to help loosen up your wallet from everyday people like you and I.

1. Save those Lincolns.

“I try and save every $5 bill I receive. I have an envelope full of fives that I hide away so I forget about it. I’m currently at about $900 in fives!”

Stephanie

2. Grab coffee from the office.

“For the first few months of the year, I promised myself I wouldn’t spend more than $1 on coffee. I was spending about $4 a day at local coffee shops, and instead bought street coffee or grabbed a cup of joe from the office. In three months I spent less than $90 — versus the average $360 I was spending before. KA-CHING!”

Jessica

3. Be an Amazon pro.

“Nerd alert — the app Paribus will keep track of what you’ve purchased and alert you and will automatically ask for a price adjustment if the price changes. Just got $8 back from Amazon this week!”

Meredith

4. Stock up on meats.

“I stock up on meats when they’re on sale and do a bit of pre-freezer prep work. I’ll portion things out — I can thinly slice chicken breasts for stir fry and then freeze that as a meal — and often will marinate them at the same time. Then I defrost it the day I want to use it. I’ve gotten dinners for my family of three down to about $4 per dinner this way, or $1.30 per person per dinner.”

Mallory

5. Check the far aisles.

“Whenever you go to a store like Target or Walmart, check the end caps, especially those along the outer perimeter of the store. That’s where they put deeply discounted items on clearance. It’s sort of a catch-all, but it’s where you can grab a box gift set of Old Spice bathing and deodorant products for $5.”

Tyler

6. Co-ops are your best friend.

“Shop at a co-op! I do all my grocery shopping at a co-op once a week and eat lots of organic and otherwise happy food for a ridiculously low price. My partner and I usually spend less than $400 on groceries a month. Bonus: You get to witness the occasional throw-down over food politics.”

Also: If you are very, very broke, most of the CSAs and farm shares in New York have tiered plans for different incomes!

Irina

7. Keep the change.

“Carrying around change is a universal hatred, and most of mine used to go absentmindedly into tip jars and in between couch cushions. I now keep an empty jar on my counter in which I dump all my change at the day’s end every day. Yes, simple trick, and nothing you haven’t heard before, but at the end of two months I end up with an extra ~$100 I would have literally given away.”

Lauren

8. Get money for your old clothes.

“H&M is currently trying to rehabilitate its image as one of the worst offenders of fast fashion. As such, H&M offers a coupon to customers who bring in a bag of clothing, and it’s worth 15 percent off their entire next purchase. They take anything, too. What does that mean?  When the consignment store like Beacon’s Closet, Plato’s Closet or Buffalo Exchange won’t take your used clothing, put it in a bag and give it to H&M for that coupon. It can be old t-shirts from Dollar General, for all H&M cares — they just want to recycle.”

Double tip: “When you’re at H&M using that coupon for 15 percent off your entire purchase, text to sign up for their newsletter to get 20 percent off of one item. They let you use it on the most expensive item too, and in conjunction with the 15 percent off coupon. Then to avoid getting their annoying texts, immediately reply “STOP” to the newsletter to unsubscribe. Then you can use the discount again next time with the same process.”

Tyler

9. Tag along to a friend’s gym.

“I go to Crunch Fitness with my friend, as her guest, for free — which eliminates paying for a monthly gym membership.”

Stephanie

10. Ride for free.

“Bike to work instead of using subway! A 30-day fare card in New York is $116. I still use the subway sometimes, so I save about $80 per month.”

Roque

11. Go cash-only.

“If I don’t want to spend frivolously, especially that week before my next paycheck, I’ll go cash-only. I know mentally that I have breathing room in my account, but if I only take out $100 for the week, I’ll be smarter every day when going out to get lunch or run for coffee knowing that I want to make those specific, tangible, in-front-of-me dollars stretch. This curbs a lot of impulse spending too.”

Mallory

*Original article courtesy of Jenny Che of the Huffington Post.

4 Ways to Be a Good Financial Role Model for Your Children

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Your children may not always look like they’re listening, but they’re certainly watching. That’s why it’s important to make sure your actions line up with what you say, especially when it comes to managing your money. Robin Taub, chartered accountant and author of A Parent’s Guide to Raising Money-Smart Kids, said the key to raising financially aware children is to lead by example. “The first step to teaching kids to be money smart is to be a good financial model. We want to be able to lead by example. Our kids are watching and learning from us and they are aware of both our positive and negative behavior around money,” said Taub. Are your actions lining up with your words? Here’s how to be a good financial role model for your children.

1. Shop responsibly.
Show your child how to shop responsibly. Both of you can start by taking stock of what you already have so that unnecessary purchases aren’t made. Once you’re ready to shop, work together on creating a shopping list. Demonstrate how to search for sales and find coupons. Refrain from purchasing items that are not on the shopping list (unless it’s truly necessary) so that your child can understand the importance of exercising self-control at a store. Impulse spending is not only bad for your budget but also sets a bad example.

2. Take your child to work.
Let your child see that you have to work for money. Demonstrate the importance of a strong work ethic and the value of contributing your talents in exchange for a paycheck. Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is a great opportunity to show your child what you do at work. Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is typically held in April each year.

3. Budget together.
Budgeting doesn’t have to be a solitary act. Instead of balancing your monthly budget alone, invite your child to watch you go through the process. Explain how to take stock of how much money is coming in and going out of the household for that month, and how you plan your spending so you don’t run out of money. This will help your child see that your pockets are not an endless source of cash. It takes careful planning and discipline to make sure you’re living at or below your means. If your child receives an allowance, this is an additional opportunity to show him or her how to budget and spend responsibly.

4. Pay bills together.
Even something as mundane as paying bills can be a teachable moment. Show your child how to write a check and balance a check register. There are plenty of downloadable and printable check registers. If you prefer, you can also keep track of your banking activity on an Excel spreadsheet. Also explain the importance of paying bills on time and in full and how late payments can impact your credit score.

*Original article source courtesy of Sheiresa Ngo at Money and Career Cheat Sheet.

7 Surprising Ways Summer Will Cost You

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We all know that summer comes with expenses — higher-priced fuel fill-ups, increased electricity bills from running the A/C nonstop, and sky-high hotel rates. But there are other items that see an uptick during vacation season that you might not immediately recognize. Here’s a list to watch with your wallet.

1. Bottled Water

We love to wag our fingers at others for buying bottled water — because get a reusable bottle already! — but we also understand that sometimes it’s necessary. Like when it’s hot as lava outside and you’re about to have a heat stroke because you forgot your reusable bottle at home. While it may seem innocuous enough to pick up a bottle at your local convenience store now and then, that’s not usually how it goes down — especially if you have kids.

According to money-saving expert Nedalee Thomas, who also happens to be CEO of a water-filtration company, a family of four will spend a whopping $1,600 on bottled water a year. Uh, come again?

“Consumption is higher in the summer just because of heat and dehydration, but families tend to buy more bottled water when heading out for the day’s activities, spending on average $12 a day for a family of four,” Thomas says. “Theme parks and many venues cost much more.”

The best way to save — if you haven’t already heard it a million times — is to refill BPA-free bottles with your own good filtered water.”

Chanson Water USA provides a comparison chart of annual costs of various types of bottled water versus what it costs to filter your own water at home, and it’s a doozy.

2. Iced Coffee

Drinking more iced coffee during the summer to give yourself a jolt and beat the heat? Well, it’s gonna cost you.

Grub Street did some digging a few years back to find out why iced coffee costs more than hot coffee, and their findings may make your temperature rise. Save yourself some gas on a trip to the java joint, and pocket the extra money you’d be spending on each cup of cold joe, by making your own watered-down pick-me-up at home.

3. Car Maintenance

Another unexpected way summer will cost you extra money is through car maintenance.

“Many dealers and mechanics want to service cars more frequently than the manufacturer recommends, especially during weather transitions, which is both unnecessary and costly,” says car expert Richard Reina. “While hot weather absolutely takes a toll on our vehicles, the best way to cut these costs is taking proper precautions and doing the simple repairs yourself.”

He offers a few DIY ways to avoid the mechanic this summer.

  • Replace wiper blades: A winter’s worth of clearing slush and ice from the windshield takes its toll, resulting in streaking and chattering that you don’t want in spring/summer downpours as it could severely hinder your vision and cause an accident.
  • Check coolant hoses and belts: It’s also important to check coolant hoses and belts for deterioration and wear, and be sure to check all fluid levels. Just as you checked your antifreeze to make sure the freezing point was well below anticipated winter temperatures, check it now to ensure you won’t have a boil over during hot summer driving. By performing this basic auto tuneup yourself, you would save $250, as it only costs $100 to DIY compared to a dealer cost of $350.
  • Test your battery: As much as the winter is harsh on batteries, summer is, too, with the constant running of the cooling fans and the pull on your alternator from driving with the windows down. Test the battery to make sure you don’t get stranded with a no-start on a summer trip. Check the battery connections for tightness and clean away any dirt and corrosion. If it’s time for a new battery, I suggest buying them at local “buyer’s club” (Costco, Sam’s Club) to save money, and change it yourself. You’ll save $120, with DIY costing $80 versus dealer prices of $200.
  • Change your engine oil and filter: Cold weather is tough on engine oil because it doesn’t get a chance to come to normal operating temperature necessary to get rid of moisture and contaminants, which can cause sludge. If you buy the oil yourself, make sure that you are certain that you are using a high-quality oil of the correct viscosity. Often, chain-store oil-change outfits may be using the same oil for different cars. If your car is older with high mileage, it can be very helpful to switch to a heavier oil with different detergent. Higher temps require higher oil weight/viscosity, and since the seals on the engine of an older car have likely started to wear, switching will help keep your engine protected. Also be sure to check the brake/steering/washer fluids while you’re under the hood. This will save you $35, as DIY costs $25 compared to dealer cost of $60.

4. Dining and Drinking Al Fresco

Warmer weather means more opportunity for eating and drinking outdoors, and if you’re not careful, it can get out of hand, financially. Nobody wants to cook indoors when it’s hot out — I get it — so think of alternative ways to eat at home, like by using the outdoor grill more frequently or making meals that don’t require a heat source, like salads, cold soups, and slow-cooker meals. If you’re drinking with your dinner, have a glass of water between adult bevies to reduce the risk of overspending, and tomorrow’s pounding headache.

5. Home and Apartment Rentals

Rental season is at its busiest during the warmer months, from May to October, for several reasons. For starters, this period is a time when many people are in transition, especially students who are looking for housing after the school year ends or before it begins. Plus, this time of year is more conducive to moving, because who wants to haul furniture around during a blizzard? Nobody, including those begrudging friends you’ve enlisted to help you. Because of these factors, and the laws of supply and demand, rental prices may be at a premium during the summer. If you have a choice, wait until the weather gets a bit cooler to make your move.

6. New Cars

According to USAA via TrueCar, you can expect to experience more sticker shock on vehicles during the summer than you would while everybody’s hibernating and generally steering clear of walking around car lots in a foot of snow. Prices increase as the weather warms because, again, of our old friend supply and demand. More people are out and about when things thaw out, and their tax refunds are burning holes in the pockets — an incentive that car dealerships fully take advantage of.

7. Ice Cream

You might think ice cream costs more during the summer because everybody is eating it, but that’s not necessarily the case. It’s sort of the reason why you may see higher prices this year, but it’s mostly because there’s a vanilla shortage in Madagascar because of poor harvest quality, and that means less mint chocolate chip for you, me, and the rest of the cone-loving U.S. population. Hey, at least we still have freeze-pops.

Have a great summer – spend wisely!

*Original article courtesy of Mikey Rox of WiseBread.com.

5 Things You Should Never Put on a Credit Card

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Credit cards can seem convenient and actually benefit your finances when used correctly. However, there are times when it’s best to avoid using a credit card as it can contribute to debt. And, there are some things you should never put on a credit card. It’s not uncommon for the average American household to have several thousands of dollars worth of revolving credit card debt to deal with, which can be crippling to overcome. Credit card interest rates are pretty high and are why you should only use your credit card to pay for affordable purchases that you can pay off in full each month. To avoid the pitfalls of debt, here are 5 things you should never put on a credit card.

1. A Down Payment

If you are financing something and putting money down, it’s best to use your own cash instead of a credit card. Financing a big purchase like a vehicle is already creating debt that you have to pay back plus interest anyway. Financing the actual down payment too with your credit card could just create additional debt after the loan. Plus, it may be a key indicator that you can’t afford the item you are trying to finance.

While a lot of places won’t accept credit card payments due to the high fee the card company charges to process the transaction, some may allow it and there may be the option to utilize a cash advance through your credit card company. Even if the option is available, it’s almost always not worth it in the end. Instead, plan to save up over time to pay for large purchases in cash, or save up at least 20 percent of the total purchase price to put down as a down payment if you choose to finance.

2. Medical Bills

Paying off medical debt with a credit card is not usually a good choice. Credit cards are attached to daily or monthly interest rates while most medical debt is not. If you feel overwhelmed by your medical debt, you can try to consolidate it or work out a payment plan with your health care provider’s accounting department to avoid having your account go to collections.

As long as you are willing to pay back your medical debt, your provider should be flexible with establishing a monthly payment plan that you can afford. This way, you can pay off all your debt interest free without having to use a credit card.

3. College Tuition

Paying for college with credit cards it not a good alternative to taking out student loans. While your credit card may have a 0% intro APR offer for the first 12-14 months, if you don’t pay off the balance in full before that period is up, you will start paying interest on the balance. The interest rates for student loans is often lower than credit card interest rates, so charging the tuition for your college education on a credit card could actually cost you more money than taking out student loans would. Not to mention, maxing out your credit card or spending more than 30 percent of your total utilization could make your credit score decrease.

If you don’t qualify for government grants or federal or private student loans, you can always apply for scholarships, go to a local community college for your first two years of college and pay for tuition in cash with the help of a part-time job, or obtain a job with a company that will offer financial assistance for higher education. Companies like Starbucks and Best Buy offer to pay a portion of employees’ college tuition as long as they meet certain requirements.

4. A Vacation

With so many travel rewards credit cards out there, it’s important to remember that the golden rule of thumb is to only use a credit card to fund your vacation when you can pay the bill off in full at the end of your billing cycle.

Earning cash back and travel discounts and rewards for spending a certain amount of money on your credit card sounds great, but if you can’t afford to spend the money in the first place, the offer can do more harm than good. For example, how great would you feel if your week-long summer vacation left you with $5,000 in credit card debt but allowed you to earn a bonus of $500 for travel? You’d still be in quite a bit of debt which could spoil your entire travel experience.

Try opening up a high-yield savings account to save money for travel each month so you won’t have to go into debt just for a vacation.

First Financial offers a Summer Savings Account where you can put aside money to save for a vacation or general summer expenses. There are no minimum balance requirements and dividends are posted annually on balances of $100 or more. You can also elect to have either 50% transferred in July AND 50% transferred in August OR 100% transferred in July.* Click here to learn more about our Summer Savings Account today!

5. Your Dream Wedding

Again, a wedding is another life changing experience that you shouldn’t charge to your credit card if you know you won’t be able to handle paying the bill. Starting your new marriage off with debt will not feel good and will delay your family’s financial progress.

If you are planning a wedding and your budget is tight, consider lowering your wedding expenses by cutting corners, starting with non-necessities or traditions that aren’t important to you. Some couples have their wedding during the off season and on an unpopular day to save money while others go so far as to cut their guest list down or doing away with extra elements like flowers or a D.J.

Ultimately, when you focus on planning a wedding that reflects your vision, your budget, and what you value, you probably won’t have to pick up your credit card to charge pricey expenses at all.

Use Your Credit Cards Wisely

If you’re going to use a credit card regularly, it’s important to know your limits and use the card wisely. Make sure your spending is not exceeding 30 percent of your utilization each month and you’re making purchases for items you actually need and can pay for, not things that you will regret later.

First Financial’s Visa® Platinum Credit Card comes fully loaded with higher credit lines, lower APR, no annual fee, no balance transfer fees, 10 day grace period, CURewards redeemable for merchandise and travel and so much more!** 

*A $5 deposit in a base savings account is required for credit union membership prior to opening any other account. Account-holder will elect to have either 50% of the funds transferred in July and 50% transferred in August OR 100% transferred in July. All Summer Savings funds are deposited into a First Financial Checking or Base Savings Account. All personal memberships are part of the Rewards First program and a $5 per month non-participation fee is charged to the base savings account for memberships not meeting the minimum requirements of the program. Visit firstffcu.com to view full Rewards First program details, and to view the Tier Level Comparison Chart. Accounts for children age 13 and under are excluded from this program.

**APR varies up to 18% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. This APR is for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. Rates quoted assume excellent borrower credit history. Your actual APR may vary based on your state of residence, approved loan amount, applicable discounts and your credit history. No Annual Fee. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Platinum Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties.

Original article source courtesy of Chonce Maddox of Lending Tree.

How to Save Money Without Disrupting Your Lifestyle

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What if you could save an additional $1,500 each year? After 30 years you would have $119,000, assuming the money was invested and you got a 6% return. That $1,500 each year — just $125 a month — can add up to quite a bit of money.

Of course, to save more money each month you likely need to cut your spending. But if you are like most people, you probably don’t want to drastically change your lifestyle. Fortunately, there are smart and simple steps you can take to trim spending without a major overhaul.

Use the 72-hour rule for purchases

How many purchases have you made on Amazon or at the store that you later regretted? Limit your impulse purchases using what personal financial author Carl Richards has called the 72-hour rule. Instead of buying an item you want immediately, wait 72 hours to see whether you still want it. You’ll be surprised at how much less you end up deciding to buy. It works great with kids – they think they can’t live without a certain toy, and then after 72 hours they forget it even existed.

Analyze big purchases

Major purchases may have the biggest impact on your spending and ability to save. It’s sometime bewildering that the same person who will drive across town to save money on gas will buy a new expensive car without analyzing the implications. The same goes for housing costs or big-ticket vacations. Here are some tips on how to analyze and save on each of these purchases:

  • Car: The Internet has been a huge help for consumers in finding car deals. With online sales you often can negotiate through email, and sites like TrueCar provide transparency about what other car buyers have paid. But when buying a new car, it’s important to consider the ongoing costs and not just the upfront purchase price. For instance, many people prefer luxury cars, but premium gas and maintenance typically will cost more for these cars. Finally, a simple rule is that the longer you keep the car, the cheaper the cost. Check out AutoSMART – First Financial’s free online car buying and research tool!
  • House: Housing tends to be the biggest expense for most people. If you plan to live in the same place for five years or more, it’s recommended you purchase a home. However, the larger and more expensive the home you purchase, the more it limits your ability to spend within the rest of your budget. For example, a couple with one child, decides to downsize because they just didn’t need the space. This was a good move financially because it gives them greater flexibility to save more, spend in other areas or retire sooner.
  • Vacation: Research locations and potential deals on sites like Kayak.com. If you can, be flexible when selecting travel dates to maximize savings. Also, compare multiple locations to determine the best fit for you and your family — and where you can get the most bang for your buck.

Rethink ongoing phone and cable plans

Most people look only at their monthly payments and often are shocked by how much they spend annually on cell phone and cable bills. When shopping for a phone plan, try MyRatePlan.com to compare plans based on the minutes, texts and data you need. Another option is to consider no-contract cell phones. The monthly cost is much lower, but you do have to buy the cell phone upfront.

With cable, the average monthly bill is $100, or $1,200 a year. “Cutting the cord” has become more popular recently as many people decide they don’t need the 100+ channels on cable. If you can do with a limited number of channels, then a streaming device and a good HDTV antenna for local channels may be all you need — and it can save you a lot of money.

Review your insurance policies

Many people are paying too much for property and casualty insurance. Every few years you should shop around your auto insurance and home insurance policies to confirm you are getting a good price. You also can see how your auto and home insurance providers rank based on consumer satisfaction by checking out the yearly report from market research firm J.D. Power.

Additionally, one way to lower premiums for home or auto policies is to raise your deductible if you have cash in the bank and you rarely make any claims. Larger deductibles typically range from $1,000 to $2,500, depending on the type of insurance you have. However, note that this does create risks if you don’t have money available or in an emergency fund if a large claim does occur.

Pick high-quality products that last

Sometimes it makes sense to spend a little more money for items you will use for a long time. A good example is men’s shoes. A high-quality pair of shoes will last almost forever and, though more expensive in the short term, will be a lot cheaper over the long run than repeatedly buying the cheapest pair. Think about the items in your life that you will use for a very long time and are worth the extra expense upfront.

Stick to a budget

First, automate your savings. It’s hard to spend what you don’t see, so automatically transferring money out of your checking account will help you keep spending down. Determine how much you should be contributing to or withdrawing from your accounts, and set up automatic monthly transfers. I like to call this forced scarcity, in that you can spend only what is in your bank account.

If this is not working and you start running up debt, try using online budgeting tools to help you create and monitor your budget. It may be more time-consuming, but you’ll know where every dollar is being spent. And if you are still having issues, consider working with a fee-only financial planner to help you develop and stick to a budget so you can reach your goals.

Hire a professional

Sometimes spending money can save you money. This can be true for home repairs, taxes, college planning and many other areas. For instance, many people miss important deductions or credits they could have claimed when they complete their own tax returns instead of working with a professional. Sometimes it makes sense to pay someone to help when it comes to house repairs and you can try to fix the problem, but might only make it worse.

So how do you decide whether to hire a professional or go it alone? If the risk of mistake is greater than the cost to hire someone, it is worth the investment. Of course, if you don’t have the time or knowledge to take care of the task at hand, it makes sense to get help, too. If you’re not sure where to look, ask for referrals from friends or co-workers, or check Angie’s List for service providers and the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors for fee-only financial planners.

Spend wisely

Ultimately, the goal is not to disrupt your lifestyle dramatically, but to make sure you spend your money wisely and efficiently. In short, it’s important to think about what you are spending your money on and what you really get out of it.

Perhaps even more important than drastically cutting your spending is thinking about the non-monetary value of your money. In a longitudinal study following 268 men for over 70 years, researchers for the Grant Study found that good relationships are key to leading a long and happy life — not how much money you have, the newest tech gadget or a certain high-profile job, but the people in your life.

Instead of spending money on more stuff, why not spend it on personal experiences with your friends and family?

*Original article source courtesy of Mike Eklund of Nerd Wallet.

8 Money Saving Hacks For Your Home

We can probably all agree that saving money is never a bad thing — and it’s even better when we don’t even have to deprive ourselves of things we enjoy, like ordering in, chai lattes, or HBO. It’s why simple ways to save money around the house are generally so awesome; they’re often small or one-time changes that pad our wallets yet take minimal effort or self-restraint.

There are so many money-saving tips that are relatively simple and achievable if you put your mind to it and almost all require a little change in routine, like packing lunches for work the night before, or consciously not buying coffee outside of the house. For the most part, they consisted of common-sense advice that you may have already considered doing yourself at one point or another (how many times have you bought that afternoon four dollar latte and already kind of known you shouldn’t).

It’s the little hidden things around the house that we often don’t even think of at all that make up the easiest ways to save money here and there, and it’s because of this that I’ve compiled eight incredibly easy and near effortless tips that will save money.

1. Unplug You Electronics At Night.

For real guys. According to Time Magazine just simply unplugging things like your laptop and TV at night can save about $100 a year. That’s 100 bucks you can spend on a massage (or, better yet, actually save…). And if this seems like a pain, just connect your devices to a single power strip and turn them all off with the click of a button each night.

2. Update Your Lightbulbs.

According to a piece in SFGate, the overall cost of an energy-efficient light bulb is $28 over it’s lifetime, whereas a regular light bulb will cost you around $120 a year in energy bills. You’re thus saving about $92 with every energy-saving bulb you purchase, and because they actually last longer, you’ll be buying them less often.

3. Don’t Buy Bottled Water.

A piece for Today about our dubious addiction to bottled water pointed out the fact that 90 percent of tap water meets regulations set up by the EPA, whereas bottled water does not technically have to meet any EPA standards, and it costs around $2 a bottle. And while the piece points out that we don’t technically need home filtering devices for safety since most tap water is actually perfectly save to drink, they’re still way cheaper than a bottle-a-day habit. So buy yourself a Nalgene or Brita and count the dollars saved!

4. Use Blinds to Reduce the Need for AC.

The piece in Time also noted that reflective blinds can reduce heat gain in summer by about 45 percent, and that means you can go that much longer without using your AC. In New York City, where electric bills are hiked up in summer specifically because the electric company anticipates more air conditioner usage, this make a huge difference. So keep those blinds down during the day while you’re at work for a much cooler home temperature when you return in the evening.

5. Clean You Dryer’s Lint Trap.

According to Melissa Maker, cleaning expert and founder of CleanYourSpace.com in an article for Today.com, just removing lint from the trap after every few loads isn’t enough. Instead you should give it a thorough cleaning every six months in order to extend your dryer’s shelf life. “Just use warm soapy water and a cleaning toothbrush, wash gently, and leave to dry overnight. Your dryer will work much more efficiently,” she said, adding, “Vacuuming the dryer lint trap is also important to remove any lodged dust, which can be a fire hazard.”

6. Cook With The Right Size Pans.

This tip from Energy.gov was totally news to me when I first read about it; apparently cooking with a pan larger than you actually need makes cooking time take longer, as larger pans absorb more heat, which means you’re spending more money on energy overall. So be sure to use the proper pan size whenever possible for a super easy money-saving hack.

7. Use Your Slow Cooker When You Can.

The same piece for Energy.gov pointed out that using a slow cooker to cook things that take several hours, like stews and chilli, burns way less energy than when cooked on the stove. This means you’ll also be paying less money on gas or electric at the end of the month.

8. Keep a Coin Jar.

This final personal tip isn’t so much about saving money as it is about keeping track of the money you never even notice you have — coins! Some people keep a coin jar in their bedroom for all of their loose change. You’ll be amazed at how much you can save up within a year – so grab a grubby cup and fill it with that pocket change!

Saving money isn’t always the most fun thing on the planet, and — let’s be real — sometimes it can actively be a bummer. The good news is there are a few super simple ways to save a few extra hundred dollars a year that won’t actually feel like you’re doing anything at all.

*Original article source courtesy of Toria Sheffield of Bustle.