More COVID-19 Scams Including Check Fraud and Medicare Theft

The Federal Trade Commission is taking extra measures to warn people of scammers that will use tactics to try and take your personal information, especially in light of the recent Coronavirus outbreak in this country. It’s important to remain aware of these current scams and schemes in order to protect yourself from fraudsters who are looking to take advantage of your vulnerability, and your money.

In the most current COVID-19 scam – fraudsters are trying to capitalize on the checks the U.S. government might be sending to American taxpayers. These scammers are looking to trap people into giving their information in order to take their money and capture sensitive information such as social security numbers and account information.

To help combat this, we’ve put together a few tips to help you identify fraud in relation to this check scam:

  1. Any money from the government will be in the form of a check and will not be immediate. Anyone who claims this money will be made immediately available is a scammer.
  2. If you have to pay anything upfront before you receive your payment, it is also not legitimate. There are no fees and no hidden charges. Anyone who says otherwise is a scammer.
  3. The government won’t call and ask for your social security number, bank account or credit card information. Anyone who asks for this information is a scammer.

If you receive any communication from someone with the above claims, The Federal Trade Commission urges you to report it through the FTC complaint center. The FTC is also an invaluable resource to stay informed and knowledgeable of current scams and schemes.

Additional scams surrounding Coronavirus to be on the lookout for:

  • Scammers going door to door claiming to be from health agencies such as the CDC or WHO, and offering at home COVID-19 testing. The victim may then be charged for the fictitious test or may become the victim of a robbery. Do not answer the door, pay for the “test,” or let this type of fraudster into your home.
  • Online sellers who contact you and claim they have in-demand products like cleaning, household, and health and medical supplies. You then place an order, but you never get your shipment. Anyone can set up shop online under almost any name — including scammers. Be careful and check for legitimacy.
  • Scammers are targeting the elderly by posing as Medicare workers and in some cases, they might tell you they’ll send you a Coronavirus test, masks, or other items in exchange for your Medicare number, social security number or other personal information. Be wary of unsolicited requests for your Medicare number or other personal information. Only give your Medicare number to participating Medicare pharmacists, primary and specialty care doctors, or people you trust to work with Medicare on your behalf.

Your privacy and protection are important to us. Feel free to reach out to us if you suspect any of your First Financial accounts have been compromised due to one of the above scams.

THINK First because There’s Harm In Not Knowing!

Article Sources:

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/coronavirus-scams-what-ftc-doing

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2020/03/checks-government

March 2020 CUNA Risk Alert

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