Don’t Fall for a Work From Home Scam

The promises of making it big by working from home are definitely out there, and most of the time it’s a scam. Though you may already be on high alert, online job scammers have gotten more sophisticated – and some may still slip past your radar.

Besides heeding the old adage that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is – job seekers should consider the following questions when reviewing potential work from home opportunities:

  • Does the job listing include the hiring company’s name and/or does the recruiter or job posting match the company’s information?
  • Are there any upfront costs required to get the job? (Supplies, a minimum investment or training fees).
  • Are there any typos on the site or in any correspondence?
  • Are you being asked to provide personal information like a social security number, credit card number, bank information, or driver’s license?
  • Did they offer you a job on the spot without conducting an interview?

If the answer is yes to any of the above, experts say that’s a red flag, and the “dream opportunity” might become a nightmare.

Here are the 5 most common work from home scams:

Career advancement grant: This scam claims to come from the government, promising you a grant to pursue education or a certification. Scammers ask for your bank account information with the promise that they will deposit the bogus grant money directly into your account.

Data entry scams: There are legitimate data entry jobs that allow you to work from home, but these scammers ask for money up front and/or promise wages that are much higher than normal.

Pyramid schemes: If the only way to make money is by others losing money or paying you as they recruit others, it’s probably a scam. Plus, pyramid schemes are also illegal – so you could be charged with a crime too.

Online reshipping: Don’t ever repack items and forward them to customers outside of the United States. What you’re doing is transporting stolen goods, and not only will you never get paid, you could also be charged with a crime.

Rebate processor: This scam promises you a salary based on the number of clicks your ad receives. It charges a training fee up front for which you will never be reimbursed, and you’ll never receive that salary, either.

Scammers can be very creative in convincing you that a position or company is legitimate, so do your research. Check with sites like BetterBusinessBureau.com, FTC.com, and Scam.com to learn of recent employment scams.

Article Source: Myriam DiGiovanni for FinancialFeed.com

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