First Financial Foundation 2014 Scholarship – Call for Entries

Happy group of students

This year, our non-profit organization — the First Financial Foundation – will be awarding (4) $500 scholarships to undergraduate students who apply on or before 11:59pm on June 30, 2014 for its Erma Dorrer Literary Scholarship.

There is one scholarship topic this year, applicants will need to answer the following question to qualify:

In today’s world, Identity Theft, Building Credit and Maintain Good Credit are essential elements in our financial lives.  How will you address these essential financial elements during your college years, and how will you guide your friends and family to address the above elements?  Your response should include details about how to protect yourself and what others should do to protect themselves from ID Theft, as well as how you plan to build credit and maintain credit for your financial future.

Applicants can submit either a written essay or video clip to answer the question.  Video clips should be recorded and uploaded to YouTube prior to applying. Creativity is encouraged! Essay or video should include your ideas for identity theft protection, and building and maintaining good credit and why these elements are important.

To qualify:

  • The scholarships will be awarded to First Financial members (as of December 31, 2013) who will attend (Fall 2014 Semester) or are currently attending a 2 or 4 year college anywhere within the country.
  • There are no age restrictions to apply – however this scholarship program is open to undergraduate students only, and trade or technical school students will not qualify.
  • A valid copy of either a college acceptance letter, student schedule, or registration confirmation must accompany all applications.

Winners will be announced by July 21, 2014.

Click here to view the 2014 Erma Dorrer Literary Scholarship Terms and Conditions.

*To apply, please email the essay or the link to your video to the First Financial Foundation at foundation@firstffcu.com, or you may send a printed copy of your essay, CD or flash drive (these will not be returned to you), and supporting documentation to the First Financial Foundation at PO Box 1172, Toms River NJ 08754.  Please be sure to list your contact information on your entry including your full name, address, phone, email, membership number and date of membership, where you are currently or will be attending college in the Fall 2014 Semester, any volunteer work you participate in, and a valid copy of either a college acceptance letter, student schedule, or registration confirmation to a 2 or 4 year college. 

College Saving Secrets

college-savings-plansThese days, it’s probably a toss-up who’s more nervous about college: you or your child. Graduates leave school with an average of $26,600 in debt — but you don’t have to leverage your 401(k) if you want to contribute. All it takes is a little planning and help from your teen to cut costs and minimize loan payments.

Do Prep Work

Assess your retirement savings. Invest in yourself first: Start putting money into a 401(k) or Roth IRA before contributing to your child’s college bills. “You can’t take out a loan for your retirement,” says Carol Stack, coauthor of The Financial Aid Handbook. “And you don’t want to end up relying on your kids to support you.” Use an online calculator like the ones on our website to find out how much you should be setting aside each month. By keeping your savings goals on track, you may have more leeway to fund your child’s education.

Discuss your contribution. It’s not easy to talk about finances with your children, says Stack, but if your teen is counting on you to help pay for school, she has to know whether and how much you plan to give each year. First Financial provides College Savings Calculator, along with many other financial calculators, than can be found here (scroll towards the middle of the page)! You’ll also want to check our blog post about the new standards for teaching your kids about money.

Save without budgeting. If you’re maxed out on what you can set aside for college, consider signing up for a rebate plan. Sallie Mae’s Upromise program offers as much as 8% back on your purchases, which can then be applied toward tuition. Before your teen enrolls in school, the rebates can be transferred into a 529 plan; after your child graduates, the reimbursements can be put toward loan payments. (Grandparents and other relatives can also sign up.)

Have “the other talk.” Choosing a university requires thought and planning. Most teens don’t decide on their top colleges until junior or senior year of high school, says Scott Weingold, cofounder of College Planning Networking. Even then, many make choices based on where their friends are going. “Starting at the beginning of their sophomore year, talk to them about what their strengths and interests are and what they like to do,” he says. “College is obnoxiously expensive enough — now add on that it’s not uncommon for kids to take up to six years to graduate.” So get them thinking in advance about schools, majors and potential careers.

Win the Scholarship Game

Start early. Even if your teen is years away from college, they should apply for scholarships. “You’d be surprised how many there are for elementary school students,” says Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of FinAid.org. Some examples are spelling, art and writing awards — not to mention a seriously lucrative $25,000 Jif prize for the most creative peanut butter sandwich. Find a list of possibilities at finaid.org/age13. Some school assignments (like a science fair project or an essay) can even qualify.

Search online. College students earn an average of $2,800 in scholarships, according to one report, making it among the best ways they can save for school. “Every dollar they are awarded is a dollar less they have to borrow,” says Kantrowitz. The best sites include ScholarshipAmerica.org, Fastweb.com, and CollegeBoard.org. Here’s how your child can maximize her efforts:

  • Rule #1: Fill out the entire profile. Scholarship “matching” sites find awards for teens by asking them to complete detailed questionnaires about themselves. Answering all the questions, including the optional ones, says Kantrowitz, will yield more results.
  • Rule #2: Apply for (almost) everything. If a student isn’t eligible for a scholarship — let’s say, they just barely missed the GPA requirement — then they can skip it. Otherwise, your teen should pursue all potential matches, says Kantrowitz. “Many applications are essays that require personal statements. The first half dozen or so will be labor intensive, but after that kids can start recycling answers,” he says. Teens should set up a Google Calendar with due dates for all scholarships and make sure they’re aware of how much time they’ll need to complete the paperwork.
  • Rule #3: Beware of scams. The biggest red flag is being asked for an application or processing fee. “Legitimate providers want to give you money, not take it from you,” says Kantrowitz. “Never invest more than a postage stamp.” Also be wary of sites that ask for personal information, like a bank account or Social Security number.

Encourage community service. Schools aren’t the only organizations that value teens who volunteer. “It looks good to many scholarship providers too,” says Lauren Segal, CEO of Scholarship America. “And it can be the tipping point for winning.” Keep in mind that colleges like to see a history of service — not just a few stints started in junior year.

Go door to door. If they’ve exhausted paper and online searches, students can visit local organizations like the Rotary club, church groups and nearby businesses to ask about scholarships. You and your spouse should also check with your human resources departments: “I’m amazed at how many companies offer grants to the children of employees,” Segal says.

This year, our non-profit organization — the First Financial Foundation – will be awarding (3) $1,000 scholarships to undergraduate students who apply on or before July 31, 2013 for its Erma Dorrer Literary Scholarship. Click here to learn how to apply today!

Keep your teen’s Facebook account appropriate. According to a new report, about one in four scholarship providers check their finalists’ online profiles. “Companies want to find students who reflect well on them,” says Kantrowitz. “They search for inappropriate behavior and offensive language, and even look at students’ natural writing style to see whether their parents probably wrote the essay for them.”

Strategize Your Search

Target a range of colleges. Include a few options that won’t leave your family or child with too much debt. “You don’t want your teen to fall in love with a school they can’t afford,” says Stack, who points out that the number of students defaulting on their loans within two years after graduation is now 9.1%. (One reason: It’s becoming harder for current graduates to find jobs.) But you don’t necessarily have to rule out all private schools, which may have more money to offer than state ones, says Weingold. “Some colleges have generous aid-giving policies, so you never know what you’ll get until you apply,” he says. To estimate how much tuition and living expenses will come to — and to get an idea of how much assistance your family may receive — visit each college’s website and look for the “net price calculator”; all U.S. schools are now required to post one.

Barter for a better financial aid package. You don’t have to accept a college’s first offer, says Weingold. Call the school’s financial aid office and explain why your family still can’t afford the expenses. If your teen has received a better package from another university, write an appeal letter, including the offer, to her first-choice school, which may match it.

Cap your borrowing. Ideally, your child’s student debt shouldn’t be higher than their yearly starting salary, says Stack. The average income for college graduates is about $42,000 and varies depending on career; visit naceweb.org to see a range of salaries. Another strategy: Keep debt below $31,000, which is the maximum you can borrow over a four-year-period through federal Stafford loans. Unlike private loans, government ones have fixed interest rates and more safety nets, plus they offer some income-based repayment plans and loan forgiveness.

Here at First Financial, we provide a cuScholar Private Student Loan for undergraduate students and cuGrad Private Student Loan Consolidation for college graduates. If you are interested in one of our loans, you can refer back to one of our previous blog posts for additional information about our student loans. If you have any questions, you can contact us at 866.750.0100 or feel free to stop into any one of our branches.

Be sure to attend our FREE Financial Aid Seminar and Pizza Night next Wednesday at 6:30pm at our Wall Office located at 1800 Route 34 North, Building 3, Suite 302. The seminar will be presented by Ken O’Connor, an 11 year veteran of higher-education finance, having served thousands of students and parents during his career as a financial aid counselor. Having assisted so many families, each having their own specific financial and educational needs, Ken has gained experience in creatively solving a multitude of the financial problems that arise with attending college. We hope to see you there!

*Click here to view the article source. 

Private student loans should be used as supplemental funding after exhausting all other sources of financial aid, including grants, scholarships, and federal student loans. Federal loans offer more attractive terms when compared to most other borrowing options, including private student loans. For more information on federal loans, visit FAFSA’s website.

The cuGrad Private Student Loan Consolidation is available to borrowers who are carrying private student loan debt. Federal student loans cannot be consolidated with the cuGrad Private Student Loan Consolidation. If you are seeking a federal student loan consolidation, you can learn more details about the process here:http://www.loanconsolidation.ed.gov/  

First Financial Foundation 2013 Scholarship – Call for Entries

collegestudents

This year, our non-profit organization — the First Financial Foundation — will be awarding (3) $1,000 scholarships to undergraduate students who apply on or before July 31, 2013 for its Erma Dorrer Literary Scholarship.

There is one scholarship topic this year, applicants will need to answer the following question to qualify:

Due to heavy competition in New Jersey with banks and financial institutions on every corner, how can First Financial bring in new credit union members? How can we differentiate ourselves and successfully carry out a membership drive within the community to recruit new members? Please answer the question as if you were a First Financial executive – what would you do to educate the local community about the benefits of a credit union membership?

Applicants can submit either a written essay or video clip to answer the question.  Video clips should be recorded and uploaded to YouTube prior to applying. Creativity is encouraged! Your essay or video should include your ideas for carrying out a new membership campaign.

To qualify:

  • The scholarships will be awarded to First Financial members (as of December 31, 2012) who will attend (Fall 2013 Semester) or are currently attending a 2 or 4 year college anywhere within the country.
  • There are no age restrictions to apply – however this scholarship program is open to undergraduate students only, and trade or technical school students will not qualify.
  • A valid copy of either a college acceptance letter, student schedule, or registration confirmation must accompany all applications.

Winners will be announced by August 15, 2013.

*To apply, please email your essay or the link to your video to the First Financial Foundation at foundation@firstffcu.com, or you may send a printed copy of your essay, CD or flash drive (these will not be returned to you), and supporting documentation to the First Financial Foundation at PO Box 1172, Toms River NJ 08754.  Please be sure to list your contact information on your entry including your full name, address, phone, email, membership number & date of membership, where you are currently or will be attending college in the Fall 2013 Semester, any volunteer work you participate in, and a valid copy of either a college acceptance letter, student schedule, or registration confirmation to a 2 or 4 year college.