First Financial FCU Hosts First NJ Retirement Fair for Staff at Asbury Park High School

PRESS RELEASE

APHS

(photo of Asbury park high school)

Wall, N.J. – Going back to the building where it was founded, First Financial Federal Credit Union brought an informative and interactive new Retirement Fair program to the staff of Asbury Park High School last month, which also happened to be the first ever Retirement Fair held in New Jersey. Throughout the day, teachers visited the library during their professional development period to learn whether they could afford the same lifestyle they are currently living once they retire, based on retirement scenarios.

The Retirement Fair was a hands-on experience where educators were provided a worksheet and then visited individual lifestyle stations such as health and fitness, food and clothing, travel and entertainment – and were given a calculation based upon a series of short questions. Once the teachers visited each station, they added their calculations and compared them to the national average to see if their current retirement savings plan was in the right place or if it needed to be adjusted.

First Financial’s Business Development Manager, Matthew Brazinski, and Investment & Retirement Center Coordinator, Samantha Schertz, gave a brief history of the credit union, explaining how it was founded right there, in the halls of Asbury Park High School in 1936. In the debriefing after the station visits, Mary LaFerriere, Financial Advisor with CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., reviewed the experience with the group, pointing out the various components of retirement to keep in mind, including inflation, debt, expenditures, investments, and more. The participants were then able to schedule an appointment with the credit union’s Investment & Retirement Center if they wished to delve deeper into retirement planning or had questions about their results.

”Retirement planning is one of the top priorities for our members here at First Financial, and we were honored to be the first in the state to host this Retirement Fair event at Asbury Park High School – the very location in which we began nearly 80 years ago,” said Issa Stephan, President/CEO at First Financial. “We hope the educators who attended realize the importance of planning and saving for retirement, and if they need help or advice – they have somewhere local to go, to help them achieve their dream goals and lifestyle.”

The National Credit Union Foundation’s REAL Solutions Program in cooperation with CUNA Mutual Group have developed this new Retirement Fair program to assist credit unions in helping their members better prepare for retirement. The fair is an interactive learning experience, similar to the popular Financial Reality Fair program offered through the New Jersey Credit Union League Foundation.

Saving May be Tough but Here’s How to Get a Handle on It

saveGetting on top of your finances can be a tough task. On paper the idea sounds simple, but in real life, it’s easier said than done.

By the time you pay down your consumer debt, put a dent in student loans, pay off your mortgage, and put extra money away for your children’s college fund and not to mention your own retirement, the list of demands for your savings is long! Online tools and advice from financial advisors suggest we can make it work but we need to rethink our approach and strategy. Here are some ideas to help you manage your savings goals:

Get real. If retirement sounds far away and “a rainy day fund” sounds kind of depressing, it’s time to rename these goals. For short-term savings objectives, identify what you want to buy and decide whether it’s important for you to finally take that dream vacation you’ve always wanted, or send your kids to college. The same extends to retirement. What does retirement look like to you: a vacation house, writing a book, or doing volunteer work? Visualize it then put a picture on your fridge so you can actually see it. It’s recommended that you should identify how much money you want to have put away at various ages in your life. Sixty-five may be hard to visualize, but goals targeted to ages 30, 40, and 50 will shorten your timeframes, making them more measurable and do-able.

Get started. The decision to save is based on a cumulative series of well thought out choices. You tell yourself you’ll save tomorrow and tomorrow never comes. If you don’t save one month it’s not terrible, but a series of those choices over your lifetime has consequences. Starting early really pays off and online tools and calculators will make the concept more real and easy for you.

Make savings planning a family affair. Providing an inheritance to your children is also about passing down values. The money tips we teach our children can be beneficial or crippling, even when we say we want our children to be financially educated to manage their finances in the future. Don’t be afraid of having money conversations as a family and talk to your kids about savings goals, spending and savings trade-offs, and even higher-level concepts such as inflation and investing, keeps everyone budget conscious.

Put your savings on autopilot. Did you know that you’re losing out on a lot of money when you don’t contribute the maximum allowable amount to your retirement plan? By committing to increase your 401(k) contribution by a percentage equal to your yearly raise will help you grow your pre-tax dollars before the money even gets distributed. Putting a stop to your daily temptations is also important – avoid going to the mall, only carry a small amount of cash in your wallet or simply leave your credit cards at home to cut back on your spending habits.

Hold your feet to the fire. When you’re spending money, ask yourself if this is a need or a want? Making this a habit enables you to keep track of your purchases and helps analyze your spending. It’s a good idea to make your own consequences when you fail to abide by your commitments – so bet on yourself. For example, if eating out has put a huge dent in your wallet, say out loud that you’ll limit yourself to two dinners out a week for the next month and then stick to your plan!

Go social. Sharing money-saving ideas or picking up tips from free sites like Mint.com and Moneyning can help make the topic of finance more enjoyable. Maybe you may want to consider starting a friendly money-saving competition — it holds you responsible, will help you stick to your saving goals and helps take your mind off your struggles.

Here at First Financial, we encourage our members to come in at least once a year for an annual financial check-up – to sit down with a representative at any one of our branches to make sure you are currently placed in the correct Rewards First tier for you, and also that you are receiving the best value, products and services based on your financial situation. Give us a call at 866.750.0100 or stop in to see us today!

Click here to view the original article source by Barbara Minnino of Fox Business.

Could Your Next Stockbroker Be a Credit Union?

Can a not-for-profit credit union, like First Financial, give you the same level of service as a for-profit commercial bank? On many fronts, the answer is a resounding yes!

Credit unions have plenty of features that make them an attractive alternative to America’s big commercial banks:

  • Good rates on loans: As a general rule, credit unions are run for the benefit of their members rather than for the benefit of owner-shareholders. As a result, they’re often able to offer low interest rates on credit cards and other loans that few of their for-profit banking peers are able to match.
  • Competitive dividend rates on deposits: Credit unions are often able to easily trump the national average of 0.1% dividends paid on savings and money market accounts.
  • Lower fees: The majority of America’s credit unions have maintained the benefit of “free checking,” when very few of America’s big commercial banks still offer the service.

But for investors, there’s still one big hole in the credit union story: stock trading.

In the competitive, complex world of banking services, it’s a reasonable question: Do credit unions offer online brokerage accounts? Is there a credit union out there where you can open a checking account, sign up for a credit card, take out a car loan, and trade stocks, all in one shop?

As it turns out, there is. Or rather, there are. Quite a few of them, including First Financial.

Time to Meet the Broker

According to Bankrate.com, there were 7,351 credit unions operating in the United States at the end of 2011, handling nearly $1 trillion in assets and serving 93.9 million customers.

Now granted, not all of these credit unions offer brokerage services. That’s not surprising. After all, not all banks offer online stock trading.

What’s actually more surprising is that quite a few credit unions do offer brokerage services, usually by teaming up with outside brokers.

A recent article in industry publication Credit Union Times, for example, described how INVEST Financial — a subsidiary of Britain’s Prudential (PUK) — teamed up with nine separate credit unions, to offer their members brokerage services.

CUSO or CUNA Who?

Now admittedly, most of these brokers aren’t exactly household names. If you’re looking for a credit union that’s partnered up with a Charles Schwab (SCHW) or E*TRADE Financial (ETFC), you may be in for a long search.

As the first couple of letters of these brokers’ names — “CUSO” and “CUNA” — suggest, at least some set up shop with the specific intent of targeting the specific market niche of Credit Union members. That said, the brokers listed don’t look to be fly-by-night shops.

San Diego-based CUSO Financial Services, for example, has been in business since 1996. CUNA Brokerage is a division of Madison, Wisconsin-based CMFG Life Insurance. Here at First Financial, our Investment and Retirement Center partners with CUNA Mutual Group to provide our members with investment, insurance and brokerage services.

So if you’re dead-set against big banks but don’t want to give up on the idea of managing your own retirement portfolio — you may not have to. There are options out there for people who’d like to switch to a credit union but who also want to keep trading stocks, mutual funds, and ETFs. First Financial can do that for you!

If you would like to set up a no-cost consultation with the Investment & Retirement Center located at First Financial Federal Credit Union to discuss your brokerage, investments, and/or savings goals, contact us at 866.750.0100 option 6.

Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Click here to view the article source.

10 IRA Tax Tips

Knowing these 10 IRA tax tips can help you when saving for retirement. When preparing taxes and setting up retirement accounts, it’s important to know how your IRA or individual retirement arrangement affects your tax return. Being knowledgeable will allow you to make smart decisions when contributing to an IRA and how to handle the account in the future until you request disbursement at retirement.

Use these ten IRA tax tips to make smart decisions regarding your retirement future:

  1. Money contributed to a traditional IRA is not taxed until disbursement. Not including Roth IRAs, the person who owns a traditional IRA is not taxed until they request money from the IRA during retirement. Usually, the person’s tax bracket is lower during retirement, saving the person money by waiting to pay taxes until they are retired.
  2. IRAs can only be owned by one person. When the person owning the IRA dies, a beneficiary can be awarded any portion of the monies in an IRA that remains.
  3. Use the correct form. When making nondeductible contributions to a traditional IRA, the taxpayer has to use Form 8606, Nondeductible IRA’s.
  4. Know if you are eligible for a tax credit. Use form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions to find out whether you qualify for a tax credit.
  5. Persons can contribute to a traditional IRA up to the age of 70 years old.  If you are 70 1/2 years or more old at the end of a tax year, you may not contribute to a traditional IRA that year.
  6. To be eligible to contribute to a traditional IRA, the person who takes out the IRA or their spouse must have taxable income from specific sources. Income can come from a salary, wages, self-employment income, tips, commissions, or bonuses. Also included are taxable alimony and maintenance payments that the owner of the IRA received during the tax year. Income that does qualify includes deferred compensation, rental property income, pension or annuity compensation, and dividend and interest income.
  7. Contributions to an IRA can be made up till the tax filing date. You can contribute for the applicable tax year (the previous year) until April 15.
  8. Funds withdrawn from an IRA are taxable the same year they are withdrawn. Withdrawals of only deductible contributions are fully taxable.
  9. Early withdrawal may be taxable. Owners of traditional IRAs who withdraw monies before they are 59-1/2 years old may have to pay an additional ten percent tax.
  10. Late withdrawal may be taxable. Owners of traditional IRAs who do not withdraw the minimum amount after they turn 70-1/2 may owe an excise tax.

Contact the First Financial’s Investment and Retirement Center to set up a no-cost consultation at 866.750.0100 option 6 or visit our website for more information.

Article Source: Made Manual, Instructions for Life http://www.mademan.com/mm/10-ira-tax-tips.html#vply=0

What You Should Save By 35, 45, and 55 To Be On Target

Getting started is half the battle when it comes to building retirement security. Setting near term goals are important too. Here’s how to do both.

Financial rules of thumb are just that. If you follow them, you have the satisfaction of knowing that you’ve taken action — but they do not guarantee you’ll get the results you desire. Still, in the savings game guideposts can be especially useful. A near-term target will help you get started, and that’s half the battle.

Here is a recently put together, age-based savings guideline with a range of savings goals that can be applicable to anyone.

Here are the guideposts:

  • At age 35, you should have saved an amount equal to your annual salary.
  • At age 45, you should have saved three times your annual salary.
  • At 55, you should have five times your salary.
  • When you retire at age 67, you should have eight times your annual pay.

There are benchmarks to hit along the way. Having near-term targets helps you stay on track—and take the necessary steps to catch up while time is on your side. But there is nothing easy about hitting these targets. It is assumed that:

  • You begin saving in a workplace retirement plan, such as a 401(k), at age 25. You save continuously and without interruption until age 67.
  • You start by making an annual salary contribution equal to 6% of pay, and raise the figure by one percentage point each year until you are saving 12% of your pay.
  • Your employer matches you at 50 cents on the dollar up to 6% of your pay and your portfolio grows 5.5% a year.
  • Social Security is factored in.
  • Your income grows 1.5 percentage points faster than inflation each year.

926013772-e1307727587893-resized-600

These assumptions are reasonable in terms of building an illustrative savings model. But consider that almost no one starts saving at 25 and millions suffer some sort of job interruption over an approximate 42-year career. This model also has you saving 12% of your pay by age 32. A common rule of thumb is 10% and again, most folks don’t get serious about saving until they are in their 40s and 50s.

Meanwhile, you will need a healthy slug of stocks to earn 5.5% a year. Yet individuals have been net sellers of stock mutual funds for at least half a decade. Whether Social Security will be available when you retire is an open question. In some cases many people are not earning as much as they used to earn, and not keeping up with the rate of inflation.

Of course, it would be a mistake to extrapolate the experience of the crisis years indefinitely into the future. Still, this exercise points up the difficulty of reaching retirement security without an early start, or hyper-aggressive saving at midlife. No matter your age, at least now you can see where you stand – and what to do about it.

Contact the First Financial’s Investment and Retirement Center if you would like to set up a no-cost consultation at 866.750.0100 option 6 or visit our website for more information.

Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), memberFINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Article Source: http://moneyland.time.com/2012/09/21/what-you-should-save-by-35-45-and-55-to-be-on-target/#ixzz29fOYAuY7

What do You Really Know about Social Security?

With all the buzz of the respective political conventions, many consumers are left scratching their heads wondering what’s happening with Social Security. Most importantly, will it be there when you need it?

Unfortunately, we don’t have a crystal ball that accurately predicts the future, so all we can do is learn where the program is now and hope for the best in the future.

For most Americans, Social Security is an integral part of their retirement plan. Sadly, for just as many, it is their only retirement plan.

Let’s review. Depending upon when you plan to retire, there are some important options to consider:

  • At this time, approximately 75% of retirees receive reduced benefits1.
  • A majority of workers don’t recall getting a Social Security statement detailing their benefits1.
  • Only one-third of potential retirees have reviewed their benefits with a financial planner to determine where they will need to supplement their retirement income1.

Considering the fact that many Americans will rely on their Social Security, these are sobering statistics indeed!

The income you receive from Social Security varies depending upon the age you retire and your marital status. It’s a good idea for spouses to coordinate their retirement strategies to ensure they enjoy a good quality of life post-retirement.

Recently, we held a Social Security seminar. Click here to view some crucial Social Security tips you might have missed from the seminar.

The Investment and Retirement Center located at First Financial Federal Credit Union can work with you to help you better understand what your options are and how to prepare to get the most out of your retirement years. Remember, knowledge is power!

For additional information about your Social Security and retirement, please visit the Investment and Retirement Center at First Financial’s Neptune Branch or to set up a no-cost consultation at 866.750.0100 option 6 or visit our website for more information.

Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), memberFINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free 800-369-2862. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members. FR091225-2315

Article Source: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/