6 Apps That Can Save Your Financial Life

Save-Money-with-AppsWelcome to the bulging world of smartphone applications that will do the logging, tracking and thinking for you as you get your financial life in order, help you follow a budget, and nudge you to pull in the reins on your spending. New smartphone apps are going to market at speedy rates as consumers, both young and old, demand on-time access to all their accounts at a moment’s notice and thanks to Mint, Bona was able to do just that.

1. Mint: Mint is the oldest and most popular free app that pools your personal-finance accounts and investments into one place. You can pull up Mint on your smartphone or laptop and set goals — like paying off credit cards or saving to buy a home — that you can follow closely through graphs and colorful pie charts. If you stray by spending too much on, say, clothing, Mint does the equivalent of yelling at you. The app will alert you when a bill is due, but you cannot actually make a payment directly. This function is actually a good thing, in that it doesn’t allow you, or anyone else, to deposit or withdraw money, move money around or pay bills. It is encouraged that you download your financial institution’s mobile app or sign-up for Online Banking to move, transfer, and/or pay bills.

Here are budgeting and bill-paying apps besides Mint that will make your financial life simpler:

2. LearnVest: This new app is an extension of the financial-planning site of the same name that’s been around since 2009, initially as a personal-finance education site for women. The free app is a lot like Mint. It helps you create budgets and prioritize your financial goals while nudging you to meet them. Like Mint, it also connects directly to all your accounts — savings, checking, credit cards, investments — and tracks every credit and debit. That gives you an instant picture with easy-to-decipher charts and graphs of your net worth as well as alerts that you’re spending too much in one category. There’s a lot of reading material to help you navigate your financial future and for an extra $19 a month, plus an initiation fee of as much as $399, you can get financial advice services.

3. HelloWallet: This app, which is owned by Morningstar, takes a behavioral science approach to business to help you plan your financial future, not just today’s bills and debt management. Its founder, Matt Fellowes, is a consumer-finance scholar at the Brookings Institution who melded technology with behavioral psychology to offer individualized personal-finance recommendations based on income, age and spending patterns. Using your GPS, for example, it can alert you that you already have spent too much money at a particular restaurant. It will also point out the gaps in your financial life, like a missing emergency-savings plan or inadequate levels of insurance. It’s primarily distributed through employee wellness plans but household memberships are available — with a three-year commitment — for $100 annually.

4. OnBudget: This new app and its fee-free prepaid-card component follow an unfussy approach to budgeting: You can’t spend more than you have. With a MasterCard prepaid debit card — what OnBudget calls a “monthly budgeting card” — you find yourself organizing spending much as your parents and grandparents may have, with different “envelopes” for each spending category. But in this case it’s virtual envelope organizational behavior that delivers real-time spending patterns, tips on saving money and constructive suggestions for better decision-making. There’s no setup involved because the software system learns your habits as you spend — and tells you about them. A plus: Unlike with most other personal-finance management tools, more than one person in a household can share a single budget. And there’s no hiding spending here because the system tracks who is spending what.

5. Better Haves: Another envelope-budgeting system, this is a relatively new one designed particularly for couples, though individuals can use it too. You can track expenses on the go and watch your color-coded envelopes deplete with each purchase. Once the envelope’s empty, everyone is advised to stop spending in that category. This one’s dashboard charts joint expenses, but there are separate tabs for joint and individual budgets. There’s even an early-warning system that a money fight could be in the offing. Plus it asks you how you felt about your spending that day.

6. Check: This is the rare app that helps you stay on top of your bills and actually pay them from your smartphone. It touts itself as a “free app that does the worrying and work for you.” Once you set it up, it sends reminders of due dates as it monitors your bank accounts and credit cards. It also alerts you in real-time of large purchases or unusual charges, but it won’t assist in budgeting.

Our Mobile App is now available for iPhone and Android users! Receive 24/7 instant access to your First Financial accounts – including bill payment, make transfers, check your balances, find branch and ATM locations, and receive account alerts. Click here to learn more and how you can download the app today!*

*You must have an account at First Financial Federal Credit Union (serving Monmouth and Ocean Counties in NJ), and be enrolled in online banking, to use this application. Standard data rates and charges may apply.

Original article source by Jennifer Waters of Personal Financial, Market Watch.

Learn How to Talk to Your Kids About Finances at this FREE Seminar in August 2014

teach-kids-howto-save-moneymomdaughtersTeaching kids about money can be done quite simply, following a few guidelines that will be taught to you at this FREE seminar. Parents are hands-down the most influential force in any child’s life, and studies show that this extends to money management. Yet, the money talk still doesn’t happen in many U.S. households. This free seminar will teach attendees about ways to get your children financially educated.

Attending this seminar, you will learn:

  • Financial literacy for every child’s lifestage
  • How to raise money-smart kids
  • Simple steps to get your children excited about saving money

Join us on Thursday, August 7th at 6:00pm for our free consumer seminar titled, How to Talk to Your Kids About Finances, presented by the experts at First Financial. The seminar will be held at our Wall Office located at 1800 Route 34 North, Building 3, Suite 302. We invite you to bring a guest but space is limited, so make sure you sign up today!

Saving May be Tough but Here’s How to Get a Handle on It

saveGetting on top of your finances can be a tough task. On paper the idea sounds simple, but in real life, it’s easier said than done.

By the time you pay down your consumer debt, put a dent in student loans, pay off your mortgage, and put extra money away for your children’s college fund and not to mention your own retirement, the list of demands for your savings is long! Online tools and advice from financial advisors suggest we can make it work but we need to rethink our approach and strategy. Here are some ideas to help you manage your savings goals:

Get real. If retirement sounds far away and “a rainy day fund” sounds kind of depressing, it’s time to rename these goals. For short-term savings objectives, identify what you want to buy and decide whether it’s important for you to finally take that dream vacation you’ve always wanted, or send your kids to college. The same extends to retirement. What does retirement look like to you: a vacation house, writing a book, or doing volunteer work? Visualize it then put a picture on your fridge so you can actually see it. It’s recommended that you should identify how much money you want to have put away at various ages in your life. Sixty-five may be hard to visualize, but goals targeted to ages 30, 40, and 50 will shorten your timeframes, making them more measurable and do-able.

Get started. The decision to save is based on a cumulative series of well thought out choices. You tell yourself you’ll save tomorrow and tomorrow never comes. If you don’t save one month it’s not terrible, but a series of those choices over your lifetime has consequences. Starting early really pays off and online tools and calculators will make the concept more real and easy for you.

Make savings planning a family affair. Providing an inheritance to your children is also about passing down values. The money tips we teach our children can be beneficial or crippling, even when we say we want our children to be financially educated to manage their finances in the future. Don’t be afraid of having money conversations as a family and talk to your kids about savings goals, spending and savings trade-offs, and even higher-level concepts such as inflation and investing, keeps everyone budget conscious.

Put your savings on autopilot. Did you know that you’re losing out on a lot of money when you don’t contribute the maximum allowable amount to your retirement plan? By committing to increase your 401(k) contribution by a percentage equal to your yearly raise will help you grow your pre-tax dollars before the money even gets distributed. Putting a stop to your daily temptations is also important – avoid going to the mall, only carry a small amount of cash in your wallet or simply leave your credit cards at home to cut back on your spending habits.

Hold your feet to the fire. When you’re spending money, ask yourself if this is a need or a want? Making this a habit enables you to keep track of your purchases and helps analyze your spending. It’s a good idea to make your own consequences when you fail to abide by your commitments – so bet on yourself. For example, if eating out has put a huge dent in your wallet, say out loud that you’ll limit yourself to two dinners out a week for the next month and then stick to your plan!

Go social. Sharing money-saving ideas or picking up tips from free sites like Mint.com and Moneyning can help make the topic of finance more enjoyable. Maybe you may want to consider starting a friendly money-saving competition — it holds you responsible, will help you stick to your saving goals and helps take your mind off your struggles.

Here at First Financial, we encourage our members to come in at least once a year for an annual financial check-up – to sit down with a representative at any one of our branches to make sure you are currently placed in the correct Rewards First tier for you, and also that you are receiving the best value, products and services based on your financial situation. Give us a call at 866.750.0100 or stop in to see us today!

Click here to view the original article source by Barbara Minnino of Fox Business.