5 Times Your Credit Score Matters Most

Credit - Arrows Hit in Red Target.Your credit score has a huge impact on the net loss or gain of some of life’s biggest financial moments: a good score gives you more options, better terms and bigger savings. Your credit score will follow you throughout your life and affect a variety of situations, but these five times are when your credit score really matters the most.

1. Financing a Car

There are three factors that determine how much financing a car will cost: how much money you put down, the length of the term of the loan and your credit score. On a $10,000, 60-month auto loan, a borrower with a low credit score could pay nearly $4,000 more in interest charges than a borrower with a prime credit score. If you have a less-than-stellar credit score, shop around for the best car loan rate available — the savings will be well worth the effort.

2. Buying a House

It’s common knowledge that your credit score matters when applying for a mortgage, but just how much your score costs you in the long run is often ignored. The difference between an excellent score and good score can cost you tens of thousands of dollars over the lifetime of a loan, and having a poor score can cost you your dream of homeownership altogether.

According to Informa Research Services*, the average national interest rate on a 30-year fixed rate mortgage for a consumer with a 760 or higher FICO score is 3.547% APR. If you take out a $200,000 mortgage loan at 3.547% APR, your monthly payment would be around $903. If you have a FICO score of 660, your rate could go up to 4.16% APR, which would raise your monthly payment by $70. The number seems negligible until you annualize those costs. The $70 increase adds up to more than $25,000 in additional interest on your home for the life of the mortgage.

3. Starting a Business

If you are a small business owner or have dreams of entrepreneurship, your personal credit is a major influence on the kind of capital you can access. Even if a business is set up as a corporation to limit personal liability, credit scores are often tied to the owner’s ability to personally guarantee the business’ debts; an analysis by the Federal Reserve estimated that 40.9 percent of all small business loans and 55.5 percent of small business borrowing is personally guaranteed.

4. Renting an Apartment

Though there are no official credit score requirements to rent an apartment, the higher your score, the better your housing options. A competitive credit score can give you the edge you need to rise above other applicants or take advantage of offers, like low down payment promotions for qualifying applicants.

Rental markets can be competitive, especially in large cities where many owners of multi-unit apartment buildings have a minimum score requirement to rent within the community. If you have a low score and have a hard time getting your rental application approved, you may have better success with a private landlord — your options will be limited but the requirements tend to be less strict.

5. Qualifying for Insurance

Insurance companies have standard practices for setting their rates, weighing various risk factors to calculate the exact rate to charge a customer, including their credit score. But the scores insurance companies use are different than the ones used by banks and financial services companies — these scores are called Insurance Credit Bureau Scores, or Insurance Risk Credit Scores.

Insurance scores consider credit information and previous insurance claim information, which allows insurers to determine how much of a risk someone is to insure. Actuarial studies suggests that someone who pays all of their bills on time, has a good credit history and hasn’t filed any insurance claims is less of a risk and a more profitable customer, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Therefore, a favorable credit score will not only get you a better rate on your insurance premiums, it could be the determining factor on whether you even get approved for coverage.

If you are looking to finance a vehicle, buy or refinance a home, or start your own business – be sure to contact First Financial for low rate loans and personalized service!**

*Calculations are accurate as of Dec. 8, 2014.

**A First Financial membership is required to obtain a First Financial loan and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties. Subject to credit approval.

Article Source: Morgan Quinn for gobankingrates.com, http://www.gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/5-times-credit-score-matter/

Learn How to “Get out of debt, manage your credit, & stop paying more than you have to!” at this FREE Seminar in March 2015

246657_bigAre you interested in improving your credit score, paying down debt, and saving money in order to get your finances on track? If so, allow the experts at First Financial to provide you with insightful information to help you manage your credit & debt in this free seminar.

Attending this seminar, you will learn:

  • What affects your credit score
  • What makes up your credit score and how to improve it
  • How to budget and cut spending
  • How to promptly pay off debt

This FREE “Get out of debt, manage your credit, & stop paying more than you have to!” Seminar will begin at 6:00pm on Thursday, March 19th at First Financial’s Neptune Branch. The seminar will teach attendees ways to keep their credit score where it should be in just a few simple steps. The seminar is located at 783 Wayside Road (Off Route 66) in Neptune. Register today, space is limited. 

Register Now!

5 Credit Assumptions You’ve Got All Wrong

Credit Inscription on Red Billboard.Let’s face it – when it comes to credit and credit scoring, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. As a result, many people make assumptions about their credit that are incorrect. Here are 5 common examples of false credit assumptions, and the truth behind each one.

1. Paying a late fee means you won’t get reported to the credit bureaus.

If you slip up and pay a bill late, getting hit with a late fee probably seems like punishment enough. After all, forking over an extra $25-$35 for your forgetfulness feels like a sufficient slap on the wrist.

But if your payment is more than 30 days overdue, you could expect a negative mark to land on your credit reports, regardless of whether or not you’ve coughed up a late fee. This is a good reason to prioritize paying on time – if you don’t, it could be costly in a number of ways.

2. Your credit utilization ratio is 0% if you pay your balance in full each month.

Paying off your credit card in full each month is a good habit to get into. But as you’re patting yourself on the back for avoiding interest charges, don’t forget to remain diligent about keeping track of your credit utilization ratio.

Here’s why: Your credit card issuer could send a balance report to the credit bureaus at any time during the month – not necessarily right after you’ve paid your bill. Consequently, keeping your balance below 30% of your available credit on all your cards throughout the month is key to maintaining a solid score.

3. All of your monthly bill payments are being reported to the credit bureaus.

Personal finance experts commonly recommend that we pay all of our bills on time. This is certainly important for avoiding late fees (see above), but it causes many people to assume that all of their bill payments are being reported to the credit bureaus.

This usually isn’t the case. Rent and utility payments are typically not reported unless you become seriously delinquent. You still should always pay on time, but these payments generally won’t give your score a boost.

4. Avoiding credit cards will help your credit score.

In an effort to avoid getting into debt, some people choose to forfeit credit cards altogether. While it’s true that maxing out a card will do damage to your credit score, avoiding plastic entirely usually isn’t a good idea, either.

Getting a credit card as soon as you can and using it responsibly (which means paying your bill on time and in full every month), is one of the easiest ways to start establishing a solid credit profile. The longer you go without establishing credit, the harder it will be to do so.

The takeaway? Using a credit card to build your credit doesn’t have to result in debt if you make a budget and track your spending carefully. Usually, the benefits of doing so outweigh the risks.

Try First Financial’s Visa Platinum Credit Card for a great low rate, rewards on purchases, no annual fee, and no balance transfer fees!*  Apply online today.

5. A bankruptcy will affect your credit for the rest of your life.

It’s true: Declaring personal bankruptcy will have a serious, negative impact on your credit. But don’t let Internet rumors or sensational media reports warp your thinking – a bankruptcy won’t actually trash your credit for life.

In most cases, a bankruptcy will stay on your credit reports for 10 years, and the effect of this event on your credit score will lessen over time. This is not to say that you should treat bankruptcy lightly, but it’s important to know that no negative mark has to affect your credit forever. By letting some time pass and cleaning up your credit habits, there’s always a way to bounce back.

*APR varies from 10.90% to 17.90% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. This APR is for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. Rates quoted assume excellent borrower credit history. Your actual APR may vary based on your state of residence, approved loan amount, applicable discounts and your credit history. No Annual Fee. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Platinum Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties.

Article Source: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/tips/credit-score/credit-assumptions/

Bad Credit Makes Everything Harder: How to Fix it and Start 2015 Off Right

07232014_Woman_Dollars_Lasso_Women_originalHaving poor credit definitely makes your life more expensive. Mortgages, car loans, insurance policies and a host of other items all carry higher rates if your credit score is low – which is why achieving and maintaining a solid credit score is a must for anyone who wants to improve their financial situation.

But higher expenses aren’t the only way a bad credit score can cost you. Renting can be more difficult, as landlords commonly pull a potential tenant’s credit score as part of the rental application process; many will dismiss renters with low credit scores without a second look. Finding the right credit card could also be a struggle, as there are fewer options for those with poor credit.

Here are three other lesser known ways that poor credit makes life more difficult – plus five tips to dig your way out of that:

1. Setting up utilities is more complicated.
For those with good credit, setting up utilities usually requires a simple phone call or two – but people with poor credit have to take extra steps. If your score is really awful, you may need to put down a deposit with each utility company to get your services started.

2. Getting a new job or promotion is more difficult.

Potential employers can’t view your actual credit score, but they can request an employment credit report, which omits your account numbers and personal information yet includes your payment history and loan information. In today’s employment market, a poor report could be the reason you’re rejected for a job or a promotion.

3. Starting a new relationship can be – complicated.
Not even your romantic life is safe from a bad credit score. Savvy consumers who are financially responsible know the potential impact of a partner’s bad credit on their own finances. According to a 2014 NerdWallet analysis, 53 percent of single adults over age 25 say they are “somewhat less likely” or “much less likely” to go out with someone with bad credit.

Though bad credit can be a heartbreaker in more ways than one – you can fix it. Here are five ways to raise your credit score:

  1. Pay your bills on time – no exceptions, no excuses. This is far and away the most important thing to build and maintain good credit.
  2. Avoid using more than 30 percent of the available credit on your cards during the month, say many experts. Monitor your balance carefully throughout your billing cycle and make a payment if you start to get too close to that threshold.
  3. Start using credit as soon as you can. The easiest way to do this is to get a credit card and use it responsibly and consistently.
  4. Only apply for credit you actually need – too many hard inquiries in the span of just a few months will ding your score.
  5. Use AnnualCreditReport.com to obtain a copy of your three credit reports once per year. Review them, carefully, for accuracy; if you spot an error, start the process of having it corrected as soon as you can.

Don’t forget about our free, online debt management tool, Debt in Focus. In just minutes, you will receive a thorough analysis of your financial situation, including powerful tips by leading financial experts to help you control your debt, build a budget, and start living the life you want to live. Feel free to check out our interactive financial calculators – we even have ones for Credit Cards and Debt Management!

Original article source by Lindsay Konsko of The Fiscal Times.

3 Sneaky Things Hurting Your Credit That You Can Easily Fix

Credit-ReportWhen it comes to understanding your credit, it can feel as complicated as trying to solve a Rubik’s cube. Frustrated by this confusion, many consumers neglect their credit, which can have a devastating impact on their financial futures.

A Consumer Action study recently revealed that 27% of Americans have never checked their credit report. That’s alarming, because it’s estimated that a large number of consumers have errors on their credit reports that could damage their credit.

Here are three things that could be hurting your credit:

1. Wrong Information

The wrong personal information on your credit report could hurt your credit. This could be things like your name misspelled, your incorrect home address, where you’ve worked in the past or even your Social Security Number listed incorrectly. How does a wrong address hurt your credit? Your information may be mixed up with someone else’s, especially if you have a common name, or are a “Jr.” or “Sr.” Or it could indicate identity theft — and that could really wreak havoc with your credit. By reviewing your credit report, you’ll be able to quickly see if there’s any information that needs to be updated or changed.

2. High Balances Compared to Limits

Another sneaky thing that could hurt you is your credit card balances — even those you pay in full. How can a credit card that you pay off hurt your credit? Issuers typically report your balances as of the statement closing date. But then those cards aren’t due until about a month later. So in the meantime, the balance on your reports may look high in comparison to your credit limits.

Generally you want the balance on each card to stay below 20 to 25% of your available credit. If you have a retail card with a small limit or a rewards card that you use to pay for everything to earn points, then this factor could come back to haunt you.

So you need to either pay your charges off before the statement closing date or ask for a higher credit limit. Of course, a higher credit limit should not be an invitation to overspend. You won’t improve your credit scores if you get in over your head with debt!

3. Outstanding or Delinquent Bills

The third sneaky thing that could hurt your credit score could be outstanding or delinquent bills. You’ll want to make sure you check your credit report to make sure that you have no outstanding bills or any delinquent bills that you need to get addressed.
Review your credit report and make sure you’re not being marked for anything delinquent that could be damaging your credit. This could be things like former gym memberships, old credit cards, or even medical bills.

*Article Source Courtesy of Jeff Rose of Daily Finance Online

How to Build Credit if You Have a Small Income

Building and maintaining a good credit score is one of the best moves you can make for piggy bankyour financial health. It might seem intimidating at first – the credit scoring system is definitely complex – but when it comes time to apply for a mortgage or other loan, you’ll be happy you made building a solid score a priority.

How does the picture change if you make a small income? As it turns out, not much. You don’t need to be a Rockefeller to achieve good credit. Take a look at the details below to learn how to build a great score, no matter how large or small your paycheck is!

First, know what makes a good score.

Before digging into specific recommendations, it’s important to understand the factors that affect your credit score. The FICO scoring model – which is the most widely used credit scoring system in the United States today, takes a lot of variables into account to create your score. These include:

• Payment history
• Amounts owed
• Length of credit history
• Mix of credit accounts
• Recent credit inquiries

You’ll notice that income is not one of the factors used to determine your credit score. This means that earning a big salary doesn’t equate to earning a high credit score. Even if you have a small income, you can succeed at scoring high, as long as you’re using the right strategies.

Obtaining credit is an important first step.

It’s empowering to know that the steps to good credit are about financial behaviors, not the size of your bank account balance. But what exactly should you be doing to get there?

Above all, it’s important to start using a credit account responsibly as soon as you can. Proving to potential lenders that you can be trusted with borrowed money is the best way to start building your credit momentum.

One of the easiest ways to do this is with a credit card. If you’re not earning much money, you might be shying away from plastic to avoid the temptation to overspend. But this may in fact stall your efforts to build good credit.

If you’re not interested in getting a credit card, obtaining another type of loan to establish a credit history is a good idea. You might have trouble getting approved if your income falls below the lender’s requirements. In this case, offering a big down payment or securing a co-signer might help you qualify as well.

Did you know First Financial has a lower rate VISA Platinum Credit Card, great rewards, no annual fee, and no balance transfer fees? Apply today!*

Keep up with good habits.

Once you’ve gained access to credit, keeping up with good habits is essential to building your score further. Specifically, you should focus on a few important behaviors.

The two most important factors the FICO score looks at are:

  • Payment history – Are you making the minimum payment required on time every time? This accounts for 35% of the FICO Score.
  • Credit Utilization – Are you keeping the balances on revolving credit (typically credit cards) below 30 percent of your available credit? This accounts for 30% of the FICO Score.

In short, paying your bills on time and in full are the two most powerful things you can do to create and hold onto a good credit score.

And just to be clear: Neither requires a big income. Spend and borrow within your means, and it will be easy to manage your payments properly.

The takeaway: Those with small incomes have the same opportunity as their high-earning counterparts to build good credit.

Use the tips above to get started today!

*APR varies from 10.90% to 17.90% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. This APR is for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. No Annual Fee. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Platinum Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties.

Article Source: Lindsay Konsko of NerdWallet

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2014/09/01/credit-score-financial-health/13628811/