10 Tips to Save Money on Your Upcoming “Big Game” Football Party

superbowl-partyIt’s that time of year when millions of people start to talk about the “Big Game.” Aside from the game itself on 2/1, these football parties are pretty big events. If you’re trying to keep to a budget this year and not spend as much on food or drinks, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Have a Potluck

One of the cheapest and easiest ways of hosting a “Big Game” party is to have a potluck where everyone brings their own dish. This not only saves you money, but also saves you time which can be even more important so you aren’t spending all your time in the kitchen and you can actually enjoy the game as well. Whether your guests want to buy something to bring or make it themselves, this is a great alternative to a traditional party where the host makes everything themselves.

Supermarket Deals

Since the “Big Game” is such an iconic event, grocery stores and brands often put popular party food items on sale during the weeks leading up to the game. Keep an eye on your local grocery store flyers for these deals so that you can buy any of your intended snacks for well below retail price.

Coupons

If supermarkets are eager to get into the hype of the game by advertising big sales on certain products, then you can bet that manufacturers are as well. This is definitely a great time to scour for coupons on certain items. Whether it’s looking on the manufacturer’s website, social media, the Sunday paper, or at the grocery store, keep an eye open for coupons that will help you save money, and make sure to use them when you’re buying your party necessities.

Make Foods That Cater to a Lot of People

While it might be tempting to go all out and create a number of smaller dishes and plates, it’s much less expensive to make a huge dish of something. For example, a giant pot of chili or a giant batch of nachos will be a lot less expensive than several rounds of appetizers. Opting for a single item that will taste good and be filling can save a ton of money on party food.

BYOB

If you’re hosting a party with alcohol involved, you might want to consider telling your guests to bring their own drinks. Alcohol can be pretty expensive, especially if you’re buying for a lot of people. Not only will it be cheaper for you, but you won’t have to deal with any complaints about the brand of beer or hard liquor you buy. You’re more than welcome to buy some alcohol to accommodate your guests, but it’s still a good idea to ask them to bring something of their own to even out the expenses.

Decorations

Some people don’t decorate for football parties while other people go crazy with decorations. If you’re looking to decorate for your party, consider picking up some decorations from a dollar store or other inexpensive store in team colors rather than branded with team logos. There’s no need to spend a lot of money for decorations that you’re probably going to throw away within 24 hours. Moreover, dollar stores have can have a surprisingly large section of party decorations.

Buy in Bulk

If you’re having an extremely large party where buying in bulk is appropriate, then you should go for it! A lot of guests means that you’ll need more food, drinks, and paper or plastic utensils, and it’ll usually be much cheaper to buy all of that in bulk rather than individually at the supermarket. But before you run out to Costco, Sam’s Club, or BJ’s, take the time to compare prices of all the stores around you to make sure that buying in bulk really will be financially to your advantage.

Don’t Splurge

You should think twice before you splurge on decadent desserts or expensive alcohol or a new flatscreen TV. While it may be tempting to have expensive foods or the latest TV in order to impress your guests, spending more money than you need isn’t always a smart idea. You don’t want to regret your spur of the moment purchases the next time you look at your bank account, after all. If you’re seriously thinking of buying expensive items in time for the big game, do your research and make sure that you’re getting the best deal.

Delivery

While it’s always nice to prepare and cook your own meals and snacks for a party, sometimes delivery is the cheaper alternative. Since the “Big Game” is such a huge deal, many pizza places or other takeout places have special deals. It’s worth considering whether or not ordering delivery is a better option for your party.

Take Stock of What You Have

Of course, one of the most important things to remember when you’re trying to host a frugal party is to take stock of what you already have. Whether this is food items you can serve or decorations that you may have forgotten about, there’s nothing worse than going out to buy something you already own. A few days before the party, go around and take stock of what you own and what you truly do need.

Happy saving and good luck to the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks!

*Article courtesy of SavingAdvice.com written by Danielle Warchol.

10 Huge Mistakes to Avoid When Trying to Save Money

downloadAddressing the issue of saving money is the most fundamental, yet neglected, aspect of personal finance in the U.S. today. According to a 2012 survey by Credit Donkey, almost 50 percent of Americans don’t have more than $500 in their emergency savings accounts, which not only puts a kink in savers’ finances in the event of an unforeseen expense, but also creates undue stress for failing to prepare a safety net adequately.

Here are the top 10 money mistakes Americans make when it comes to saving money.

1. Not budgeting.
There are a number of philosophies on the best approach to take when budgeting your money, but at times the thought of sitting down with statements, bills, and an expense sheet is just too stressful. This mind-set is an easy trap to fall victim to, but is one of the worst money mistakes to make if you want to grow your savings fund.

2. Saving too little.
It’s commendable that about half of Credit Donkey’s survey participants had saved up some cash; but often, individuals don’t save enough money to carry themselves through a challenging and sudden financial crisis. A common recommendation when it comes to the appropriate amount to save in a nest egg is about three months’ salary, or six months worth of expenses (i.e. mortgage, auto loan, utility bills, gas, etc.).

For instance, the average American in 2013 made $42,693 before taxes. Take away about 25 percent of that income for taxes, and the average person walks away with $32,020 annually. Three months of net income (the ideal emergency fund amount) is about $8,000 to help keep you comfortably afloat in an emergency.

3. Not setting specific goals.
Determining what exactly you’re saving for, and when you need to save by, is a helpful motivational guide to follow. It acts as a constant reminder of what you’re working toward, and lets you know when your efforts have been successful.

Examples of this include saving money for a down payment on a car in the next six months, or getting more specific like committing to saving $200 per month for the next six months, to achieve this goal.

4. Failing to track spending.
Creating a budget is the start of the savings process and setting a goal is the end of it, but there has to be a quantitative way to follow your progression in the time between. Tools such as Mint.com  or even a simple spreadsheet are great ways to avoid this money mistake.

5. Living paycheck to paycheck.
When budgeting your spending allowance, don’t stretch your money to the last dollar. Not allowing yourself about a $100 per month buffer sets you up for disaster, as small, seemingly harmless purchases quickly add up.

6. Overdrawing an account.
Overdrawing a checking account is usually the result of making one of these other money mistakes, but expensive overdraft fees are a cost you have complete control over. A $35 overdraft fee might not sting now, but as more pile up on your account statement, the damage can become apparent in a short period of time.

Simply put, overdrawing is a money waster and an entirely avoidable circumstance if you stay diligent with your savings plan.

7. Claiming the wrong tax withholding.
Claiming the lowest withholding allowance when it comes to your federal taxes is a mistake that Americans commonly make. When you do so, the government takes away more income taxes throughout the year, and you’re left with a fat tax return check.

Don’t let this windfall fool you — what you’re doing is essentially giving Uncle Sam an interest-free loan and getting nothing back in return. Instead, you can claim the withholding allowance you rightfully qualify for, and use the extra cash in each paycheck to grow your savings fund in a high-interest savings account.

8. Signing up for low deductibles.
One way to increase the amount of cash you can save each month is to lower your premium and raise your deductible for auto and health insurance. This means you assume more risk up front by paying a lower monthly premium, with the expectation to pay more out of pocket in the event you have to file a claim (which should be no problem if you’ve saved that emergency fund).

According to the Insurance Information Institute, increasing your deductible from $200 to $1,000 can lower collision and comprehensive coverage premiums by at least 40 percent.

9. Buying name brands.
More customers are employing frugal tactics like passing on branded products in lieu of a generic version. Similarly, retailers have caught onto the fact that shoppers are looking for a frugal alternative in today’s challenging economic times.

That’s not to say you should never splurge on a brand that’s worth it, but most generics are the same product as their pricier counterparts. Look for generic products on the lower shelves of grocers’ aisles.

10. Waiting.
One of the worst money mistakes you can make is procrastinating on getting started with your savings plan, since achieving a savings goal can take longer than you might expect. Paying $500 per month toward an emergency fund at the income outlined in mistake No. 2, for example, would take the average American 16 months to save up three months’ income.

Utilize First Financial’s free, anonymous debt management tool, Debt in Focus. In just minutes, you will receive a thorough analysis of your financial situation, including powerful tips by leading financial experts to help you control your debt, build a budget, and start living the life you want to live.

Here at First Financial, we also encourage our members to come in at least once a year for an annual financial check-up – to sit down with a representative at any one of our branches to make sure you are currently placed in the correct Rewards First tier for you, and also that you are receiving the best value, products and services based on your financial situation. Give us a call at 866.750.0100 or stop in to see us today!

*Click here to view the original source by Nasdaq.

Free “I Bought What?? How to Not Be Afraid When You Open Your Bills and Stick to a Budget” Seminar in February 2015

courtney-method-budgetingGet your finances in order for the new year! Join the experts at First Financial at our budgeting seminar to help get on the right financial path for 2015. If you’re interested in attaining financial stability, understanding budgets, or saving money we encourage you and a guest to attend.

Attendees will learn how to:

  • Build an emergency fund to avoid money pitfalls.
  • Create and maintain a simple budgeting worksheet.
  • Pay bills on time.
  • Pay yourself by saving money.

Join us on Tuesday, February 3rd at 6:00pm for our “I Bought What?? How to Not Be Afraid When You Open Your Bills and Stick to a Budget,” seminar presented by the experts at First Financial. The seminar will take place at our Toms River Branch located at 1360 Route 9 South (Corner of Routes 9 & 571), Toms River. Space is limited, so make sure you sign up today!

Register Now!

The Smartest Post-College Money Plan: Start Budgeting Now

budget deficit - recession 3d conceptIf you’ve recently graduated from college, and especially if you don’t have a job, it might seem ridiculous to turn your attention to budgeting. You’re exhausted from exams, and you have no money to budget. Why worry now, right?

It’s a fair question, but as anyone who has been there knows, this is precisely the time to avoid money mistakes. Unless you’re lucky and your parents are willing to pay your way for the time being, from free rent to food, to going out with your friends, you’re going to be spending in the near future – and spending too much can naturally lead to trouble.

For instance, many recent college graduates rely heavily on credit cards. When you don’t have a job, it’s not the best idea to pile all of your expenses on your credit card and figure you’ll pay it off once you get a job.

So if you’re an unemployed recent college graduate, here are some strategies to consider implementing to set yourself up for a bright financial future – debt free.

Get a job. It may not necessarily be your dream job, but find a job. It’s recommended that you visit temp agencies and recruiters to find an emergency job. It’s important to have some money coming in, even if the position isn’t closely related to your major or what you want to do in life.

New grads should not be so picky. It isn’t necessary that you get your dream job right out of college, you have to work your way up to get that job. Don’t worry, it’s okay to take a week or two off after graduation to recoup and relax – but generally, try not to waste too much time and start looking for a steady source of income.

Don’t stay in that hastily found job for long. Start looking for a better career move as soon as possible – you want the money coming in, not satisfaction settling in. If you’ve been at the job for more than six months, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and ask everyone you know for recommendations, or put yourself out on LinkedIn – because when it comes to job hunting, it always helps to know someone.

Live cheaply. You know what it’s like to live on a college budget, so don’t go crazy with spending your money on entertainment, clothes, travel, or going out. It’s not the best idea to spend money carelessly if you don’t land a job soon because the more you spend, the deeper you will dig yourself into debt.

It may be tough to go the frugal route and watch TV with your parents instead of going to the movies with your friends, but you should think about your new spending habits as “financial yoga – hurts now, helps later.” Even if you have a new, promising job, it’s smart to keep your expenses as low as possible – think about getting roommates.

That might be the last thing you want to hear if you had a bunch of roommates in college and you’re itching to finally live solo, but roommates will allow you to cut back on your rent and utilities in a big way. Whatever you do, keep expenses low so you can see what your budget can handle. You don’t want to get an apartment, update your wardrobe and buy a car, then realize your entry-level paycheck can’t handle the financial stress.

For a list of helpful college graduate accounts, loans, and services available at First Financial, click here. We know there are things you need to set-up your financial future, so we’ve customized some of our products and services like special Savings and Checking accounts, as well as an auto loan offer and more – to make this next step of your life one smooth ride.  Remember, if you ever need any financial guidance or have a question, reach out to us at 866.750.0100, email info@firstffcu.com or feel free to stop by any of our locations – we are here to help!

*Click here to view the article source by Geoff Williams of US News.

 

The 10 Commandments of Saving Money

saving moneyThere are thousands of savings tips that can help you grow your nest egg. Whether they involve brown-bagging it to work or using coupons at the supermarket, these are generally useful savings habits that can give you a leg up on ending each month in the black.

But there are only a few super-sized savings rules that can truly transform your finances. Rules so big they deserve to be etched in stone. So, here are the “The Ten Commandments” of saving.

1. Thou Shalt Know Where Thy Money Goes

When generals go to war, they need an overview of the battlefield. Maps, exploration and data show them where the enemy is susceptible. In the battle for savings, the first thing you have to know is where your money is going.

Sites like Mint.com allow you to connect all your bank accounts, credit cards and loans to cloud-based software so you to track your finances on one screen, in real time, with just the click of a button. They also analyze your expenses and highlight areas where you might be wasting money. Best of all, it’s free.

2. Thou Shalt Eliminate Debt with Extreme Prejudice

Debt is bad, but it’s the interest on that debt that’s like kryptonite to your savings goals, and the sooner you eliminate it, the sooner you can become a savings Superman.

You can also track your finances and debt with First Financial’s free, anonymous debt management tool, Debt in Focus. In just minutes, you will receive a thorough analysis of your financial situation, including powerful tips by leading financial experts to help you control your debt, build a budget, and start living the life you want to live.

Moving debt from high-interest instruments, like credit cards, to lower-interest instruments, like a line of credit, is a start. Consolidation loans can be a help as well, but the easiest way to get out of debt fast is to take the interest expense you save and put it directly toward your debt’s principal amount.

First Financial’s Visa Platinum Credit Card starts as low as 10.9% APR!* It’s a good idea to check the APR on your current credit cards to see if it’s time to switch. Keep in mind, we also don’t have any balance transfer fees and as an additional BONUS, for a limited time if you are approved for a balance transfer of $5,000 or more to our VISA Platinum Credit Card, you will receive 10,000 bonus CURewards Points! You can apply for the balance transfer by stopping into any branch or by calling 866.750.0100 to be sent a balance transfer request form.**

3. Thou Shalt Read the Fine Print

Most people would be shocked at the amount of money that they waste on service charges, convenience fees and annual dues hidden in financial contracts. If that low-interest credit card charges you $99 annually no matter if you use it or not, is it really that great of a deal?

Bank where checks are included and there is no minimum balance requirement (like a First Financial Checking Account!.*** Make sure if you transfer a balance to a lower-interest credit card that there is not a transaction fee attached. And if you rarely or never use that credit card with the annual fee, think about applying for a card that better suits your financial well-being.

4. Thou Shalt Pay Attention to Timing

At the risk of sounding like a ’60s folk-rock star, to everything there is a season, and waiting for the right season to purchase big-ticket items can save you a bundle. For example, car dealers will discount their inventory when the new model year arrives to free up room on their lots, so If you are in the market for a new car, that’s the season to buy.

Many big-box retailers and department stores have semi-annual sales where you can pick up appliances, electronics and home goods at a discount. The key is to fight against the urge for instant gratification on your purchases.

5. Thou Shalt Keep an Eye on Interest Rates

Even if you are able to pay off your credit cards and loans, the one debt most people can’t pay off is their home mortgage, which is why you should watch interest rates. When interest rates move down, it can be an opportunity to refinance your home loan and save money on your monthly mortgage payment.

But remember, if you just take the money you save and spend it, you’re not saving at all. Earmark the difference between your new mortgage payment and your old one for your bank account, or if you plan to live in your home for the life of the loan, put the extra toward your principal and own your home sooner.

We offer a number of great mortgage options, including refinancing – click here to learn about our features and services and see what’s a good fit for you! To receive updates on our low Mortgage Rates straight to your mobile phone, text FIRSTRATE to 69302 and each time our Mortgage Rates change, we’ll send you a text message with the new rates.****

6. Thou Shalt Find Money in Thy House

Most people would be surprised to learn just how much money they have laying around their house. Those books you’ve already read can be sold on Cash4Books or Amazon.com, and your old phones and mobile devices can be sold to companies like Gazelle.

Cleaning out the clutter in your home doesn’t just feel good but provides you with an opportunity to feed your piggy bank by having a garage or yard sale. And what about those figurines you inherited or your comic book collection? Do you still really want them? If not, try listing them on eBay.

7. Thou Shalt Use Technology to Find Deals

The Internet makes saving money so easy that your grandmother would likely throw her coupon box at your head if she knew. Sites like Groupon and Living Social will send deals on goods and services in to your inbox, and apps like Out of Milk can alert you to store sales just by driving by them.

The Internet also is a great resource for finding free activities for you and your family to do on weekends, holidays and school breaks.

Subscribe to our First Scoop Blog and receive free, fun financial education straight to your inbox – at the beginning of each month we post a budget-friendly activity list for that month in Monmouth and Ocean Counties, NJ!

8. Thou Shalt Not Forget to Prioritize Your Retirement

This is a tough one, because it’s hard to save money now that you don’t expect to use for 30 or 40 years. But like it or not, there is going to come a time when your earning years are over and we will all need a retirement fund to bankroll the golden years. So if you don’t want yours to be bronze years, you have to make retirement saving a priority.

The good news is that you have many years to accumulate those funds and to let them grow, which means that small amounts of savings directed toward it can go a long way. For example, you can take a percentage out of every saved dollar, say 25 percent, and earmark it for your retirement. This is an easy and painless way to create both a short-term and long-term savings fund.

To set up a no-obligation appointment with our Investment & Retirement Center to go over your retirement and investment portfolio or to get started with one, call 732.312.1565 or email samantha.schertz@cunamutual.com. *****

9. Thou Shalt Not Try to Keep Up With the Joneses

A huge part of winning the saving game is changing your mindset about how you think of money and what its function is. Too often we get caught up in the game of keeping up with the Joneses and buy things we don’t really want — and certainly don’t need — just to keep up appearances.

What many people don’t take into account is that that boat, RV, ATV, third car or giant flat screen that their neighbor bought probably comes with a loan or a high-interest credit card payment. Before making that next impulsive purchase, ask yourself if you really want it and if it will bring you that same warm fuzzy feeling that a full savings account will.

10. Thou Shalt Act Like Thy Don’t Even Have It

We can’t spend what we don’t have, so the more you act like you don’t have it, the more you will be able to save it. Have retirement and college savings funds automatically deducted from your paycheck before you ever see it. Schedule a “secret” payment from your checking account to your savings account each week.

When you come across found money — like a rebate, an overpayment refund or even $20 in your pants pocket — just act like you never had it and put it right into your savings. With practice, you can get pretty good at this, so much so that if you have an unexpected windfall — say from an investment or an inheritance — you’ll forget it even happened. Only your savings account will know.

Click here to view the article source by Brian Lund of Daily Finance.

*APR varies from 10.90% to 17.90% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. This APR is for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. Rates quoted assume excellent borrower credit history. Your actual APR may vary based on your state of residence, approved loan amount, applicable discounts and your credit history. No Annual Fee. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Platinum Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties.

**Additional bonus points will be reflected within 30 days from the balance transfer approval and can be viewed when signed into your VISA Platinum Card Account online through Online Banking. In order to redeem bonus points, an offer reference must be made to a First Financial representative. Bonus points can only be redeemed one time per member, on an approved balance transfer of $5,000 or greater during the promotional period of 4/28/14 – 12/31/14.

***A $5 deposit in a base savings account is required for credit union membership prior to opening any other account. All personal memberships are part of the Rewards First program and a $5 per month non-participation fee is charged to the base savings account for memberships not meeting the minimum requirements of the Bronze Tier. Visit firstffcu.com to view full Rewards First program details, and to view the Tier Level Comparison Chart. Accounts for children age 13 and under are excluded from this program.

****Standard text messaging and data rates may apply.

*****Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

 

5 Budget Killers You Can Avoid

budgeting-money-to-conquer-debtCreating a budget is the first step in taking control of your finances. Sticking to your budget is another challenge altogether.

Even when you believe you have factored in every cost you may encounter by week, by month or by year, somehow you end up needing more money than you allocated – right? If this sounds like you, you are likely encountering a budget killer (or several). Below are some of the most common costs that can cause you to veer off your budgeting course.

1. Account Maintenance Fees: Some big bank accounts and credit cards tack on fees if you don’t maintain your account or meet specific requirements. Some charge you extra if you don’t maintain a certain balance, if you write too many checks, or if you don’t make enough transactions. These can add up quickly. Make sure when choosing an account or credit card, you read the specifics of your account agreement carefully. Look into which checking accounts and credit cards offer services that fit your lifestyle.

Be sure to check out the variety of flexible Checking Account options that we offer here at First Financial including First Protection, High Yield, Free, Go Green Checking and more. Plus, if you’re on the hunt for a great new maintenance-free credit card with rewards, click here to learn more about our low-rate Visa Platinum Credit Card and apply online.

2. Subscriptions: While seemingly low monthly fees can be attractive, subscription magazines and online services (think Netflix, Hulu, etc.) add up. These costs are hurting your budget if you are not using the services or if you could find them elsewhere online for free. Eventually, these just become another add-on to your monthly payments so it’s a good idea every so often to re-evaluate whether yours are worth keeping.

3. Credit Card Interest: Credit cards have several attractive features: allowing you to buy now and pay later, providing cash back, and helping you earn points toward a new car, vacation or night out. Paying installments on your purchases over time may appear to be a great way to buy all your monthly and superfluous purchases. However, high interest rates add up over time if you carry a balance and you can find yourself deep in debt before you know it. You may think you are paying off your purchase when all you are doing is treading water by paying off the interest. To avoid this, it’s important to know the interest rates of your credit cards, pay off your balance in full every month, and save before you purchase. Carrying a lot of debt can have longer-term implications on your credit scores too. If you want to see how your debt is affecting your credit, check out our free and anonymous debt management tool, Debt in Focus and be sure to take advantage of our First Score service to learn ways to improve your score as well.

Did you know that our Visa Platinum Credit Card rate starts as low as 10.9% and offers rewards?* It’s a good idea to check the APR of some of your current credit cards to see if it’s time to switch! Keep in mind, we also don’t have any balance transfer fees – and as an additional BONUS, for a limited time if you are approved for a balance transfer of $5,000 or more to our VISA Platinum Credit Card, you will receive 10,000 bonus CURewards Points! You can apply for the balance transfer by stopping into any branch or calling 866.750.0100 to be sent a balance transfer request form.**

4. Excess Phone, Cable & Utility Bills: Many households are paying hundreds of dollars for TV, Internet, cell phone, and utility expenses each month. No matter how comfortable these tools make us, they are taking up valuable space in our budgets. Look through your bills carefully and try to scale back from services you aren’t using or do not need to use, from running the air-conditioning while you are at work to paying for a DVR on a second TV you never even watch. Also, be sure you are not paying for a level of service you don’t need. If these alterations don’t bring a big enough impact on your budget, consider alternatives like prepaid phone services and switching cable providers.

5. Convenience Fees: Certain businesses tack on “convenience fees” when you utilize their goods or services as a way to make up any added expenses that can incur during your transaction. Be wary of these types of fees before you make various transactions, to see if there is a less expensive way for you to do so.

Having an emergency fund can be a big help when you come in over budget. This money can save you from stress when you have fallen victim to these and other budget killers. It’s a good idea though to deal with the root issue instead of repeatedly ruining your budget and having to dip into your emergency fund. If you do have to use that money, it’s important to replace it and frequently evaluate your budget to match your changing lifestyle.

Article source courtesy of Fox Business.

*APR varies from 10.90% to 17.90% when you open your account based on your credit worthiness. This APR is for purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances and will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Subject to credit approval. Rates quoted assume excellent borrower credit history. Your actual APR may vary based on your state of residence, approved loan amount, applicable discounts and your credit history. No Annual Fee. Other fees that apply: Cash advance fee of 1% of advance ($5 minimum and $25 maximum), Late Payment Fee of up to $25, Foreign Transaction Fee of 1% plus foreign exchange rate of transaction amount, $5 Card Replacement Fee, and Returned Payment Fee of up to $25. A First Financial membership is required to obtain a VISA Platinum Card and is available to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties.

**Additional bonus points will be reflected within 30 days from the balance transfer approval and can be viewed when signed into your VISA Platinum Card Account online through Online Banking. In order to redeem bonus points, an offer reference must be made to a First Financial representative. Bonus points can only be redeemed one time per member, on an approved balance transfer of $5,000 or greater during the promotional period of 4/28/14 – 12/31/14.