Things to Do on a Budget in Monmouth and Ocean Counties This September 2014

Family-fall-leavesAs the summer quickly comes to a close and your children prepare to go back to school, it’s important to make time for family activities. This September, there are so many things to do that are fun and low cost  for everyone.  Check out these budget friendly activities that are going on locally, and make some memories with your family and friends!

Saturday, August 30 – Start your day with the Spring Lake Labor Day End of Summer Celebration & Sale/Art Walk. This all day event takes place on Third Ave from 8 am – 5 pm. For more information, call 732-449-0037.

Monday, September 1 – Kick off September with a night out at Show Place Ice Cream Parlour (Beach Haven, LBI).  Enjoy a show and dessert as you become part of the entertainment. Watch the talented staff perform Cabaret, show tunes, and improvisation. For more information, call 609-492-0018.

Wednesday, September 10 – What better way to start fall off then a Farmers Market! Come to Downtown Toms River from 11am – 5pm for a fabulous day at the market. Check out fresh produce, baked goods, honey, herbs, nuts, and prepared foods. You can enjoy a yummy lunch under the tents with your family and friends on this beautiful day. Parking is also FREE! For more information, contact Huddy Park at 732-341-8783.

Saturday, September 13 – Take your children to Jenkinson’s Aquarium (Pt. Pleasant) for a behind the scenes tour. Ages 5 and up are permitted to join for a fun morning to learn about what goes on in the Aquarium. Prices are $10.00 for children and $14.00 for Adults. For more information, contact Jenkinson’s at 732-899-1659.

Sunday, September 14 – 5K Race or 1 Mile Fun Run for the 9/11 Heroes 2014 (Wall Township) will take place starting at 8am at the Wall Municipal Complex on Allaire Rd. For more details visit wall@911heroesrun.org or click here.

Wednesday, September 17- Have a Girls Night Out at Laurita Winery (New Egypt)! Laurita calls out all ladies and their friends to enjoy a night of yoga, wine, and relaxation from 6-9 pm. Admission is free. Finish the night off with the sounds of live music and good laughs. For more information, call 609-752-0200.

Saturday, September 20 – Support scholarships and classroom grants in Monmouth and Ocean Counties by attending the First Financial Foundation’s Food Truck & Restaurant Bash at our Toms River Branch from 1-5pm! Join us for a fun day of food truck/restaurant vendors, games, entertainment, prizes and more. Entry donation is $5 per person (kids 12 and under are free!) and advanced tickets pay be purchased in any First Financial Branch or online using Credit/Debit/PayPal. We hope to see you there!

Sunday, September 21 – Come out to Freehold and check out the Circus at iPlayAmerica. The one and only Michael Dubois is the featured performer for the day. Bring your children, parents, and friends for a 40 minute show filled with magic, juggling, slack wire, and sideshow stunts! This is one event you certainly DO NOT want to miss! First show starts at 12pm and the second starts at 3pm. Tickets are under $20.00.  For more information, call 732-577-8200.

Saturday, September 27 – Join Allaire Village for a fun-filled day at the 1830’s Fall Harvest (Wall)!  Explore what life was like during the 1830’s with villagers as they cook food over the hearth, make apple cider, and play historic games. Kids can take part in arts and crafts and go on wagon rides around the village. Don’t miss the exciting demonstrations with ax and knife throwing, and fire starting. Admission is $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children ages 5-12. For more information, call 732-919-3500.

Have a great start to your fall season!

Is There Such a Thing as Good Debt?

3d man sitting sad with text 'debt'.Most of the time, the word “debt” has negative connotations. Debt costs you money and therefore takes money away from financial goals like saving and investing.
So could there ever be good debt? That’s no easy answer. How you use debt has a big impact on whether or not you can consider it “good.” If you have too much of a “good” thing — that’s when it can turn into bad debt. So let’s consider 3 types of debt: investing in a college education, buying a home, and starting a business.

1. Are Student Loans Always Good Debt?
Student loans aren’t always good debt, because most people don’t consider how long they’ll be paying back their student loans when they take them out. But that doesn’t make them bad. If you take them out to obtain a job that you could have only secured with a college education and earn enough to make your student loan repayments manageable, your student loan debt was a good debt.

Here are some tips for student loans:

  • Keep your total loans under your projected starting salary when you graduate. If you’re able to do that, you should be able to pay them off with the standard 10-year plan.
  • Cut down on the loan amount. Get college credits while you’re in high school, go to a community college for your first two years, stick to a state school, and apply for scholarships.
  • Get a job to pay for your living expenses while you’re in school so you don’t take out loans for living expenses.
  • Keep in mind that private student loans don’t offer the flexibility of federal loans, so try to apply for federal student loans first.

Check out our FREE student loan calculator here to help manage your student loan debt, which will show you how much you can save by consolidating multiple loans or how to pay off your high interest student loan debt as quickly as possible.

2. How Much Should I Borrow for a Mortgage?
Owning a home used to be considered the American dream, and for many people it still is. Most people need to take out a mortgage for their purchase. If you think you’ll be in the same area for several years and can put a 20% down payment on a home, a mortgage could be a good long-term investment. Interest rates on mortgages are historically low, and owning a home can also provide tax benefits. The nice thing about a home is that it’s an investment you can live in.

However, many people end up buying a home without thinking about how it will affect their lifestyle or how they’ll pay their mortgage if an emergency came up. To avoid this, here are a few rules of thumb:

  • Make a 20% down payment so you can avoid paying private mortgage insurance.
  • Don’t use your entire savings account for a down payment. Homes are a hotbed for dipping into your emergency savings, as there are far more unexpected expenses that come up than when you’re living in an apartment.
  • Boost your credit score before you buy. Make sure you have a score above 700 so you can qualify for the best mortgage rates available. This can save you thousands of dollars in interest over the life of the loan.

Try First Financial’s First Score Credit Counseling program; a low cost, interactive session ($30) with a First Financial expert, which simulates your credit score with various “what if” scenarios. You can email us at firstscore@firstffcu.com or call 866.750.0100, Option 4 to get started.

  • If you think you might move in the next five years, you might want to rent so you don’t have to move during a down market and possibly sell your home for a loss.
  • In figuring out your monthly housing costs, the principal and interest on the mortgage loom large. But don’t forget property taxes, insurance, utilities, repairs, landscaping, snow removal and other factors. Make sure that your monthly housing expenses leave room for other expenses too.

We offer a number of great mortgage options, including refinancing – click here to learn about our 10, 15, and 30 year mortgage features and see what a good fit for your home is!*

To receive updates on our low mortgage rates straight to your mobile phone, text FIRSTRATE to 69302 and each time our mortgage rates change, we’ll send you a text message with the new rates.**

3. What About Using a Loan to Start a New Business?
Entrepreneurship seems to be the new job security for many people in this generation. Incurring debt to start a business can be good debt if the funds help you to build a sustainable livelihood that allows you to repay any money borrowed and improve your financial situation. Just be cautious of how much debt you’re taking on.

Follow these tips to be financially smart and successful in your business:

  • Self-fund your business venture with savings first.
  • The smaller the investment, the quicker you can make money.
  • Do your research and get experience in the field before your launch. Some business opportunities require much bigger up-front investments, which may lead to a small business loan.

Did you know First Financial offers Business accounts, loans, and services? We understand that not every business is the same and, therefore, not every loan need can be the same.  This is exactly why we look at each individual business and create a customized lending solution to meet your specific needs. Please contact us at business@firstffcu.com and we’ll be happy to provide you with more information on business loans and services.

Debt Costs Money, So Use it Wisely
Debt can be good, but only if it helps you leverage your assets to build wealth. Every good debt has the potential to turn bad, so do your research first. The fewer monthly obligations you have, the more money you have to fund a lifestyle that you love.

Don’t forget about our free, online debt management tool, Debt in Focus. In just minutes, you will receive a thorough analysis of your financial situation, including powerful tips by leading financial experts to help you control your debt, build a budget, and start living the life you want to live.

*A First Financial membership is required to obtain a mortgage and is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties. Subject to credit approval. Credit worthiness determines your APR.

 **Standard text messaging and data rates may apply.

 Article Courtesy of Daily Finance Online by Sophia Bera

Down to Business: What to Consider When Writing a Business Plan

DowntoBizMattMegan

Remember writing term papers in high school or college? You had to prove a point using evidence provided by your research of the topic. In many ways, a business plan is proving the following thesis: “I can successfully operate a sustainable business.” So what research do you need to prove this idea?

  • Market Research – Who are your competitors in the area? What are their prices for comparable services? How will you differentiate your product/service from theirs?
  • Financials – Create realistic projections for the money you will make and lose over the next 3 years. Explain how you came up with these figures, and how they will figure in to the growth of your company. Also include the amount of money you, your partners, and your investors (if applicable) are contributing to the start up.
  • Biographies – Who’s who in the organization? What skills, experience, and talent does each of the business owners/partners bring to the proverbial table? Understand how each person will make the business successful.
    • What are the duties of each person employed by the company?
    • Each person should provide a personal financial statement
    • How will matters be resolved if the partners cannot agree on an issue?
  • Marketing Plan – How will your potential patrons know about your business? How much of your budget is devoted to marketing? Depending on the type of business, will you do traditional advertising, or organic word of mouth marketing?
  • The Company Itself – What product or service are you providing, and how will you be doing this? How did you originally get involved in the industry? What makes this industry a worthwhile use of your time, energy, and money?

These are only a few of the aspects to consider when creating a business plan. You can find many seminars on how to write a business plan for little to no cost at local libraries, local community colleges – particularly Brookdale Community College, and of course at First Financial Federal Credit Union. Formal templates can be found at www.SBA.gov or www.SCORE.org. Use these questions provided, along with one of their templates, to prove your thesis – you can, in fact, operate a successful business…once you have the right plan!

For more information about any of First Financial’s business accounts and services, you can contact Business Development Manager, Matthew Brazinski, at 732.312.1421 or Business Development Officer, Megan Shull, at 732.312.1426 or simply leave a comment below! 

First Financial Foundation Announces Winners of 2014 Erma Dorrer Literary Scholarship

Press Release

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(L to R): 2014 scholarship winners Kimberly Rogers, Demonica Britt, Michael Perry, President/CEO Issa Stephan, and Carly Burrus.

WALL, N.J. – The First Financial Federal Credit Union Foundation (www.firstffcu.com) recently awarded $500 scholarships to four deserving undergraduate students.

This year’s winners included: Kimberly Rogers of Ocean Township, Georgian Court University; Demonica Britt of Freehold, Seton Hall University; Michael Perry of Freehold, Boston College; and Carly Burrus of Neptune, Coastal Carolina University.

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Pictured above: 2014 scholarship winner Kimberly Rogers with Issa Stephan and her parents.

This year, there was one scholarship topic for student applicants to respond to: In today’s world, identity theft, building credit and maintaining good credit are essential elements in our financial lives.  How will you address these essential financial elements during your college years, and how will you guide your friends and family to address the above elements?  Your response should include details about how to protect yourself and what others should do to protect themselves from ID theft, as well as how you plan to build credit and maintain credit for your financial future.

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Pictured above: 2014 scholarship winner Demonica Britt with Issa Stephan and her daughters.

Applicants submitted a written essay or video clip to answer the question, and had to be a member of the credit union by 12/31/13 and about to attend for fall 2014 or currently attending a 2 or 4 year college anywhere in the country.

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Pictured above: 2014 scholarship winner Michael Perry with Issa Stephan and his parents and grandmother.

“We are thrilled to be able to aid these admirable and bright students in their journey of success and education,” said First Financial President and CEO, Issa Stephan.  “Our credit union puts a high priority on education, after all – that’s how First Financial began 78 years ago, with a group of schoolteachers in Asbury Park.”

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Pictured above: 2014 scholarship winner Carly Burrus with Issa Stephan and her mother.

View more about this year’s scholarships and the First Financial Foundation on First Financial’s website.

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About the First Financial Foundation:

Since 1994, First Financial has supported the Monmouth & Ocean communities with the Erma Dorrer Scholarship Program. Today, that program has been extended into the First Financial Foundation to assist charitable organizations of the Monmouth & Ocean County Communities.  The First Financial Federal Credit Union Foundation is a non-profit working to support a variety of community programs and organizations throughout Monmouth and Ocean Counties.  We direct 100% of your contributions to programs because all administrative expenses are paid for by First Financial Federal Credit Union.  To learn more, visit www.firstffcu.com.

How to Assess a Neighborhood When House Hunting

House-HuntingWhen you buy a house, you aren’t just buying a house. In a way, you’re buying a neighborhood. After all, you’ll likely choose a home partly because it’s close to work, the schools are great, or it’s walking distance to restaurants and stores.

In fact, you could argue that picking the right neighborhood is more important than picking the right house. The last thing you want is to buy property in a place where everyone is trying to leave. So if you’re looking for a home for your house, here are some things to consider.

1. What to look for. If you’ve been focused on your dream house and not your dream neighborhood, the most popular areas tend to be ones that offer an instant sense of community to those relocating there. If living in the right community is important to you, then it’s important to think about these five factors:

  1. Aesthetics. An attractive neighborhood indicates the residents care about it.
  2. Affordability. Sure, you want an inexpensive house, but you also want to be able to afford the cost of living in the neighborhood.
  3. Safe environment. Nobody wants a criminal as a neighbor.
  4. Easy access to goods and services. Can you make a quick run to the bank or grocery store, or will every day be a headache behind the wheel due to traffic congestion or construction?
  5. Walking distance to goods and services. If exercise and a sense of community are important to you, find a house near the establishments you’ll be frequenting that is accessible by foot.

2. Online research. You probably use websites like Zillow.com, Realtor.com, Trulia.com, or Homes.com to search for a new house. But there are neighborhood-related websites and apps as well. Here’s a sampling of what’s available:

  • HomeFacts.com. This website contains mostly neighborhood statistics and information, but it also has data on more than 100 million U.S. homes (type in the street address of your prospective house to get the scoop on the whole area). Wondering how many foreclosures are in the area or if there are any environmental concerns? This is your site.
  • NeighborhoodScout.com. Read up on crime, school, and real estate reports for the neighborhood you’re considering.
  • Greatschools.org. Here, you can find reviews written by parents and students of schools in the neighborhood you’re considering. You can also find test scores and other data that may help you decide if this is a school you want your kids to attend.
  • CommuteInfo.org. This site offers a commuting calculator. Plug in information like miles driven and how many miles per gallon your car averages, and the calculator will give you an average cost of what your commute costs may look like in a month and in a year.

3. Red flags. As you’d expect, spotting a neighborhood on the decline isn’t rocket science. For example, pay attention to the property maintenance – overgrown lawns and shrubs, toys left outside, garbage bins not taken in – often reflect that the area is not well cared for and it can negatively affect the property value.

Though things are subject to change, selecting the right neighborhood is important. Your neighborhood’s character will likely shape your family’s character.

If you’re looking to purchase or refinance a home, First Financial has a variety of options available to you, including 10, 15, and 30 year mortgages. We offer great low rates, no pre-payment penalties, easy application process, financing on your primary residence, vacation home or investment property, plus so much more! For rates and more information, call us at 866.750.0100, Option 4 for the Lending Department.*

You can also sign up for our Mortgage Rate Text Messaging Service to receive updates on our low mortgage rates straight to your mobile phone. To be a part of the program, text FIRSTRATE to 69302 and each time our mortgage rates change, we’ll send you a text message with the new rates.** 

*A First Financial membership is required to obtain a mortgage and is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, volunteers, or attends school in Monmouth or Ocean Counties. Subject to credit approval. Credit worthiness determines your APR.

**Standard text messaging and data rates may apply.

Article courtesy of US News Online by Geoff Williams.